Tag Archives: #Nonverbal

HOW CAN YOU DETECT LIES

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Body language is very helpful when it comes to detecting lies, but it is not the only method people can use. There are 30 non-visual cues that can be used to aid in the detection of lies:

  1. Unusual eye contact
  2. Pupil dilation
  3. Change in blink rate
  4. Eye blocks (touching around the eyes)
  5. Blushing or blanching
  6. Fake smile
  7. Retracted lips
  8. Duper’s Delight (a fleeting smile after an untruthful statement)
  9. Under- or overproduction of saliva
  10. Nose touching
  11. Mouth touching
  12. Vocal cues
  13. Clammy palms
  14. Foot movements
  15. Unusual stillness
  16. Pacifying gestures
  17. Decreased illustrators (using fewer hand gestures)
  18. Hidden hands
  19. Nervous laughter
  20. Cathartic exhale
  21. Fidgeting
  22. Gestures after words
  23. Partial shrug
  24. Torso shield
  25. Distancing behaviors
  26. Forward lean
  27. Foot locks
  28. Longer or shorter response times
  29. Frequent and shallow breathing
  30. Throat clearing

HOW TO IMPROVE FOCUS AT WORK

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Ten Ways to Improve Focus at Work 

One of the best ways to use time most effectively is to improve one’s concentration skills, love to  recommends the following techniques.

1. Start small. Concentration can be learned by taking small steps over time.

2. Find a quiet place. It easier to concentrate in quiet workspaces and less busy times of the day.

3. Get an early start or stay late. Consider going to the office early to get a jumpstart on projects or staying later in the day.

4. Move lunch time. To avoid crowds, consider moving lunch either before or after noon.

5. Take shorter, more frequent breaks. Taking five to ten minute breaks every couple of hours increases people’s energy and focus.

6. Control personal interaction. Schedule daily social interactions with co-workers. This helps to prevent unplanned interruptions.

7. Acknowledge then dismiss distracting thoughts. When distracting thoughts arise, accept them and if necessary write them down. Then dismiss them.

8. Reward success. It can be useful to reward oneself for reaching a goal’s interim steps. Small rewards on a daily basis can increase focus.

9. Tackle big opportunities. Challenges often motivate people to perform at higher levels.

10. Maintain a steady pace. The most successful people exhibit two personality traits: persistence and consistency.

COMMUNICATION WITH GENY

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The most jarring of Gen Y’s workplace behaviors is their connectedness. They are — they expect to be — in constant communication with their friends by phone, by e-mail, by instant messaging, and by text messages. They are the first digital generation, and

Screen Shot 2015-08-12 at 6.00.34 pmthose who preceded them must accept that the way we communicate has changed. While the rest of us learn a second, technological language, Gen Yers are native speakers of a language with a different grammar, vocabulary, and etiquette; cross-generational misunderstandings, confusion and resentment often result. In addition, electronic communication has led Gen Y to become impatient with what strikes others as only minor delays. They expect instant messaging. Since so many of their friendships are electronic rather than face-to-face, they have not acquired the ability to read inflections and body language, an ability that is a key part of emotional intelligence. The relative anonymity of electronic communication has fostered an egalitarian style of communication whose informality often offends people.

Employers who focus on impatience, lack of people skills, multitasking, and casual language will miss the unique contribution Gen Y brings to the workplace: their technological fluency can create new possibilities for the company and add global perspectives. The authors advise the following:

  • Recognize that the Gen Y preference for electronic rather than paper communications is both ecologically sound and cost-effective.
  • Build intergenerational relationships and improve performance and productivity by letting Gen Y employees teach communication technology to older coworkers.
  • Take advantage of Gen Y’s ability to gather information from the whole world.
  • Allow them to multitask because they will do it anyway.
  • Model good communication form in the workplace by using “I” statements rather than “you” statements.
  • Set the limits to teach what is and is not appropriate professional behavior.
  • Let Gen Y employees hone leadership and mentoring skills by allowing them to use their technological expertise.
  • Build social relationships through emotionally intelligent communication.

MANAGING NONVERBAL DELIVERY

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Screen Shot 2015-08-12 at 8.11.34 pm*  Power-pose before speaking. Speakers can improve their confidence and performance simply by changing their posture before speaking.

* Enter the stage with confident energy. While all speakers feel some anxiety, the best ones are able to channel nervous energy into calm confidence. When entering the stage, they project a level of energy that reinforces the purpose of their speech.

* Speakers should settle themselves and connect with the audience before speaking. Speakers commonly fuss with papers or computers before they speak. Listeners will have a better first impression of someone who comes across as composed and relaxed.

* Decide on a base position for hands. When not gesturing, speakers need to place their hands so as to feel and look comfortable. Relaxing hands and arms at one’s sides conveys friendliness, while holding hands together at navel level appears more authoritative.

* Hold eye contact with individuals for 3-5 seconds. To encourage trust, speakers should choose specific listeners and hold eye contact with them for approximately the length of one or two sentences.

* Match movement to message and venue. Some speeches are best without movement. Business presentations and some other types need a small degree of movement. Keynotes require the most movement.

* Start and end at the front and center of the stage. This is a natural focal point for the audience. It also minimizes the distance between speaker and listeners.

* In stories, give each character a personality. To bring characters to life, it is important to give them distinctive physical presences and voices. Additionally, each character may be acted out at a particular stage location.

* Gesture naturally. There is no perfect number or type of gesture. Speakers should use whatever gestures seem natural and appropriate to the message.

* Accept applause gracefully. Standing still when finishing a business presentation signals confidence and invites questions.

* Maintain poise while exiting. Speakers who leave the stage with confidence and poise can keep an emotional bond with the audience as they depart.

* Dress to relate. It is a mistake to over- or under-dress. The speaker’s goal should be to dress in the same style and one step above the audience; for example, wearing a suit for a business presentation where most listeners’ attire is business casual.

VISUAL AIDS in PRESENTATION SKILLS

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Visual aids clarify information and transmit it more efficiently. As the saying goes, “A picture is worth a thousand words.” They also anchor the presentation and keep the presenter on task. Screen Shot 2015-08-12 at 7.25.37 pmAudiences enjoy visual aids, no matter how charismatic the speaker. They also help those who are visual rather than auditory or kinesthetic learners.

Although seemingly outdated, traditional visual aids such as flip charts and overheads still have their place. Flip charts are large and can be difficult to transport, but every good speaker should know how to use them. They do not need a darkened room or any supporting technology. Good charts are few in number, simple, and bold. Practicing on plain paper ahead of the presentation will help.

There are a few tricks for flip charts:

*Leaving a blank page between each one used will prevent bleed through.

*Writing done lightly in pencil ahead of the presentation will not be visible to the audience. This is useful trick for notes, such as reminder of what’s on the next page.

*Flip charts can be reused if they are handled properly between engagements.

*Adding color is good, but only one accent color should be used along with black.

*Perforated flip charts allow pages to be removed and hung around the room. Post-it-note style charts are also available.

Many speakers use handouts because they ensure every audience member can see the main points. They also provide a reference for later. However, if the audience reads a handout instead of watching the presentation, they can distract from the speaker.

Most speakers today use LCD projectors attached to computers. The price of projectors and projector bulbs, once prohibitively expensive, has fallen significantly. Laskowski also carries a set of portable speakers that plug into his computer. The projector should be given a dry run before the presentation, ensuring that it is positioned the proper distance from the screen, that everything is connected properly, and that there are no technical problems.

No matter the medium, visual aids must be large and clear. For an audience 30 feet away, a 24-point type might suffice, but at 75 or 100 feet, the speaker needs letters as large as 48 point. Also, whether visual aids are as low-tech as flip charts or as high-tech as LCD projects, there is no substitute for practicing, including a quick run through the visual aids on site before the performance.

ELEVATOR PITCH

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Screen Shot 2015-08-12 at 6.52.59 pmAn elevator pitch is a classic technique whereby an individual sells something in a very short period of time. This is accomplished in three easy steps:

  1. Create a scene that demonstrates what problem the product solves.
  2. Pre-answer anticipated questions and concerns.
  3. Close the deal with an action step while asking for a commitment.

Individuals should avoid the common mistake of continuing to sell after someone has already bought. They must adopt the posture that they are doing the customer a favor, not the other way around.

NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION

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An audience will consider the messenger before considering the message. They want evidence that the speaker is sincere, honest, interested, confident, and in control. A good speaker will dress at least as well as the best-dressed member of the audience and will always face the audience while speaking.

Screen Shot 2015-08-12 at 7.31.19 pmOn stage, good speakers are the focus of attention; they are their own most important visual aid. They use gestures to clarify and dramatize ideas. In fact, gesturing will help dissipate nervous energy. Types of gestures include:

*Gestures above the shoulders suggest inspiration, uplift, and emotion.

*Below-the-shoulders gestures display sadness, apathy, or condemnation.

*Gestures done at shoulder level suggest serenity and calm.

*Emphatic gestures underline the words being spoken.

*Descriptive gestures help the audience visualize an object or concept.

*Prompting gestures are useful in evoking a response. For example, after asking a question, the speaker will raise a hand to prompt the audience to do the same.

Gesturing should be practiced all the time so that it becomes a habit. Gestures should come naturally, although on stage presenters need to reach beyond their normal comfort zones. Just as they raise their voices to be heard at a distance, so too must they extend and exaggerate their gestures.

How and when to move about is another puzzle for would-be presenters. Movement always attracts audience attention, so it should not be haphazard. The presenter should never move without a reason. Stepping forward indicates arriving at a key point while stepping backwards allows the audience to relax after a point has been concluded. Lateral movements, such as walking across the stage, indicate transitions.

SCIENCE OF BODY LANGUAGE

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Body language is used for instruction or to communicate information, to emphasize a point or emotion, or to indicate the purpose of spoken language.

Anubha's Session on Non Verbal Communication

Anubha’s Session on Non Verbal Communication

Phipps developed the YODA system for body language. YODA stands for You, Observe, Decode, and Adapt. It is a simple way to understand that by observing and understanding body language, an individual can change their own body language and verbal interactions to better suit any situation. Phipps’ focus is on body language in the business setting, he applies the YODA system to the many interactions that take place in the professional environment.

The Science of Body Language

There is a connection between the internal world of thought and the external world of bodily expression. If an individual focuses on a particular thought long enough (it may just be a few seconds), his physical body will reflect that thought. The brain has the capacity to process external stimuli in a variety of ways. There is a neurolinguistic abbreviation for the senses: VAKOG or visual, auditory, kinesthetic, olfactory, and gustatory. By listening to the way others speak and determining which of the senses dominates their speech, people can find ways to bond with others. Visual people use phrases like: “see what I mean,” whereas the auditory inclined use terms such as: “how does that sound?” This is a key piece of information for someone looking to dominate a conversation or persuade another to their way of thinking. This falls under the “observe”part of the YODA system.

It is important to practice using nonverbal signals before attempting to use them in public. At first, they will seem disjointed and uncomfortable; however, as the gestures are practiced, they will become more natural both for the speaker and the audience. It is also important to be flexible and willing to meet listeners on a common ground.

A speaker should identify his or her intentions before beginning to speak. It is important to clarify what the speaker hopes to gain from the communication, and tailor nonverbal signals to that intention. Observe the audience’s nonverbal signals to be sure that the message is being received as intended.

Though learning about and understanding how nonverbal signals work is important, the true value of nonverbal signals comes in implementation. Practice and usage of nonverbal signals are what really allow people to become great communicators. When a person finally implements nonverbal signals successfully, he or she will truly be empowered as a leader and will achieve a high level of communication success.