Tag Archives: Leadership

CREATE YOUR OWN UNIVERSE

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In the business world, individuals must attempt to understand their unique gifts and contributions and use that understanding to effect change in their organizations. This process requires self-reflection and having the determination to follow one’s “passion, imagination, and vision.”

Study–Finish What You Start

For many, the path to success begins with formal education. Lessons learned in that process can be applied to the business environment as well. Succeeding in college requires:

*Doing due diligence and carefully selecting the right school and program.

*Properly finishing what is started. Even if a class or program is dropped, it should be dropped in accordance with established procedures.

*Trusting one’s instincts about continued education (i.e., graduate school versus joining the workforce).

*Learning to love the concept of studying (education does not stop at the school doors).

The following practices will help make the most of the formal education experience as preparation for a successful career:

*Tailor curriculum to the business sector one seeks to join.

*Create a written plan for managing both school and non-school commitments.

*Develop and maintain a good study environment.

*Know and use one’s best learning style (i.e., auditory, visual, kinesthetic).

*Ask questions and build relationships.

*Gain experience and volunteer.

*Celebrate successes.

Networking for Novices

Networking is a business fundamental, and it is all about showing an interest in others. Networking can occur both in-person and online. The college campus offers abundant opportunities for networking. It is as easy as striking up a conversation with the person in the next seat in a lecture hall. Lastly, networking is mutual; it is not about getting something but about helping one another.

Students can build their networking skills by:

*Leveraging friends and family as resources for new contacts.

*Tapping online resources like LinkedIn to identify potential new connections.

*Spending time meeting people at face-to-face events like conferences, workshops, and social activities.

*Not being deterred by nerves; feeling nervous about meeting new people is natural.

*Creating personal business cards.

*Being real; authenticity should be at the core of everyone’s behavior.

*Remembering that networking is not an opportunity to brag; it is an opportunity to listen and share.

Get LinkedIn

A great networking first step is to create a LinkedIn profile. LinkedIn has become a highly regarded professional networking platform that regularly adds value for professionals, not only in terms of making connections that can further their career goals, but also in terms of idea and opinion sharing.

Some ways to make the most of the LinkedIn experience include:

*Posting a professional-looking photo.

*Creating a strong headline and summary statement (look at other profiles for examples).

*Maximizing experience, including volunteer and extra-curricular activities.

*Including education and related activities.

*Asking for endorsements from others (and endorsing them in return).

*Highlighting achievements, honors, and awards, but only if they apply to career goals.

*Getting recommendations from teachers, employers, and fellow students.

*Joining LinkedIn groups, companies, and influencers.

Creating a Résumé That Gets Read

A résumé is much more than a list of skills and achievements; it is a view into an individual’s personality. Revealing personality in a simple, meaningful, and engaging way is what will make an individual’s résumé stand out from the crowd. Some tips for creating a standout résumé include:

*Avoiding clichés.

*Proofreading carefully.

*Including a well-crafted cover letter that is job-specific, showcases personal achievements, matches key job requirements to personal qualities, and illustrates potential contributions.

*Listing all contact information.

*Syncing online profiles with the résumé; and keeping them professional.

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HOW TO BUILD SELF-CONFIDENCE

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SELF-CONFIDENCE TOOLS AND STRATEGIES

Success in the workplace is tied to self-confidence, which is a key competency in the self-awareness cluster of Emotional Intelligence. According to the author, “a confident leader exudes a strong self-presentation and expresses him or herself in an assured, impressive, and unhesitant manner.”

Henry Fisker, the CEO of the luxury car company Fisker Coachbuild LLC and one of the leading automotive designers, is a Star Performer full of confidence. He is profiled in detail, and shares his 10 Secrets & Current Practices that make him a successful, top performer:

1. Take Private Time. Fisker takes one hour and a half each day at lunchtime to exercise and contemplate problems. He explores different angles and solutions until he gets a “feeling” and decides the best course of action.

2. Get Third Opinions. He believes it is valuable to solicit and get others’ viewpoints even if he is confident in what he thinks.

3. Evaluate Capacities. Fisker makes it a regular practice to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of his team. He then understands individual capacities and when he needs to make a decision he is able to delegate tasks based on strengths.

4. Shoot From The Hip. Fisker believes that employees do not like to be over-managed, and want to feel motivated. He therefore prefers the perception of quick and firm decisions like ‘shooting from the hip.’ His decision making process is in fact more calculated and he relies on the first three secrets to base his decisions and empower his team.

5. Go With That Gut Feeling. Fisker advocates this visceral approach as it allows for quick decision-making and is more accurate than logical thinking. All experiences have an emotional component.

6. Take Initiative. Taking initiative defines a Star Performance based in confidence. After the ‘gut feeling,’ Fisker evaluates the risks associated with it and if deemed appropriate takes action.

7. Identify Your Strengths and Weaknesses. Leaders should be cognizant of their weaknesses. He defines weaknesses as “things you could do, but don’t like to do.” Preferring to lead with his strengths and excel, he delegates to others things he likes to do the least. This keeps him “energized, creative, and competent.”

8. Take Responsibility For Your Mistakes. Fisker promotes leaders being honest with themselves and admitting to their mistakes in order to learn and grow. Being responsible for one’s actions leads to clarity and less problems down the road.

9. Reinforce People. Fisker is adept at motivating his team members. He asks questions to stay abreast of what they think and do. By engaging them, he is able to recognize and support their hard work.

10. Be Willing To Make Decisions That Are Exceptions To The Rule. Being successful at times means not following the rules and procedures. Fisker asserts that a leader needs to weigh the consequences of a decision, decide if it is worth the risk, and then act on it.

To emphasize, Nadler offers ten proven strategies to try and further improve self-confidence:

* Being On Your Case Vs. Being On Your Side. Many leaders have defective evaluation systems, are overcritical of their own performance, and rarely satisfied with their own success. “Being On Your Own Case” leads to erosion in self-confidence, unhappiness, and unintentional treatment of others in the same way. A faulty evaluation system can be changed by reframing it to “Being On Your Side” and will result in improved confidence and greater awareness of how an individual evaluate their self and others.

* Reflections on Thinking. It is common to have an internal dialogue. According to the author, the issue is the type of internal questions that are asked. Negative questions such as “Why didn’t I say something smart at the meeting?” produce negative answers, which heavily erode confidence. Paying more attention to the internal questions will help to take control of negative self-talk.

* Busting Perfection: Creating Realistic Expectations. Perfectionism is a form of self-evaluation that stunts performance and sets leaders up for failure and frustration. There is a ‘perfection loop’ where unrealistic expectations are set without critical thinking that creates an unconscious pattern of failure. One must become aware of the unproductive pattern, understand the steps that cause it, and know how to break the cycle. The goal is to set realistic and attainable expectations.

* Success Rules: Who Is Running You? Many leaders are living by rules for being successful that are outdated, rigid, and over-generalized. This unconscious behavior can be re-programmed to enhance self-confidence otherwise there will be feelings of dissatisfaction and failure. Writing down and becoming aware of the rules that drive performance is an important first step.

* Success Log. Nadler advocates writing a success log chronologically with age brackets. The goal is to get a clear picture of many successes in life which are sometimes forgotten or minimized. Reviewing the list builds confidence.

* Current Success Log. The next strategy is to keep a current log of daily or weekly achievements and successes, and after a few months to analyze it to define personal strengths.

* The Five Pivotal People In Your Life. Another useful tool to build confidence comes from Dr. Phil McGraw. He believes that each of us have five pivotal people who represent a positive force, and contribute to a sense of self-confidence and worth. It is useful to write these people down, and reflect on their influence.

* Visualization. Regularly visualizing and mastering the most challenging situations as leaders will improve confidence. This practice creates neural pathways that make the actual performance more natural.

* Decisiveness. Strong leaders act as consensus builders. It is better for leaders to delay sharing their opinions early in the decision-making process and take the role of facilitator with the group. Their views can come out at the end of the process, bringing all the information together, resulting in a better decision. Decisiveness then requires a timetable and action.

* Thin-Slicing. Malcolm Gladwell, author of Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking, coined the term ‘thin-slicing’. He defines it as “the ability of our unconscious to find patterns in situations and behavior based on narrow slices of experience.” Very successful executives are adept at utilizing intuition when reaching decisions, and it is a skill, argues Gladwell that can be cultivated by others.

Cognitive Learning

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Six cognitive strategy groupings can speed up learning, improve learner retention, and accelerate the learning process. Cognitive strategies are the

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Session with Anubha Maurya W and become Trainer and OD Professional with PRISM course

thought processes with which people study and learn. Unlike metacognitive skills, which are higher-level functions, cognitive strategies are applicable to specific, practical learning situations. Good learners use a variety of strategies in the classroom

The six cognitive strategies for learning are:

1. Clustering: The student arranges data for easier grasp and retention.

2. Spatial: The learner arranges information visually in a way that makes it easy to understand and remember, like organizing steps into a flow chart.

3. Advance organizers: The instructor provides brief introductory information that helps the learner visualize the upcoming coursework.

4. Image-rich comparisons: The learner utilizes analogies, metaphors, and literal comparisons that bridge past knowledge with new learning.

5. Repetition: Learners practice content until they learn it, as when students learn their multiplication tables.

6. Memory aids: Learners use words, letters, or images in easy-to-remember ways that enhance retention of more complex subject matter

IS TIME MANAGEMENT IMPORTANT

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Time is a precious commodity. Each person has the same amount of time, 24 hours each day, to use productively or to waste. Many people believe that time management is one of the top reasons that individuals succeed or fail both professionally and in their personal lives. Zeller describes a broad variety of time management techniques and systems that can be used by people in different professional roles, as well as at home to ensure that they are making the most of their time every day.Training Session with Anubha with Manufacturing team

STARTING WITH SIMPLE TIME MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES

Before delving into detailed techniques for better time management, it is useful to take a look at the bigger picture, and analyze why time is so valuable. Zeller suggests taking a step back and considering one’s life goals and the value of one’s time in the long run.

The best time managers consider in depth the link between time management and their life goals. When a person understands his or her short, medium, or long-term goals, it helps shape the way time is then used as a result. Clear goals create a sense of urgency which motivates people to accomplish more in less time. Studies have shown that individuals who document their goals are more likely to achieve them in a shorter period of time. Zeller recommends identifying at least 50 goals to accomplish in the next ten years. The next step is to isolate the three most important goals to achieve within one year, three year, five year, and ten year timeframes. This exercise can help to effectively focus energy.

Another useful exercise is to determine what a person feels they are worth on a per hour analysis. When an individual understands the value of time after breaking it down to an hour-by-hour basis, it is easier to make educated decisions about how to organize their tasks. The goal should be to use time in a way that provides the best return on investment. A key question then becomes whether the time to perform a task costs more or less than hiring someone to do the work. Additionally, leisure activities should produce as much value as one’s hourly income rate. For example, a person might choose to pay a landscaping service to mow their lawn in order to spend that time doing something more enjoyable and personally productive.

ESTABLISHING A TIME MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

After identifying one’s time management goals, it is a good idea to prioritize them. This results in a structured plan for attaining them. A basic principle called the 80/20 rule is important to remember. This principle suggests that 20 percent of a person’s tasks will generate 80 percent of their desired results. To maximize one’s productivity, therefore, it is necessary to place a high priority on the important activities that fall into the 20 percent zone. Zeller suggests that people identify their top 12 goals as well as identify the tasks necessary to accomplish them. These tasks should be broken down into a list of daily “to do” items. On a daily task list, the “A items” are those that will lead to a major consequence if not completed, while “B items” have only minor consequences if not completed, and “C items” have no penalty if not completed by the end of the day.

In addition to prioritization, techniques like time blocking, organization, and electronic tools can all support a robust time management system.

*Time blocking. Time blocking is a technique that can be used to schedule tasks during the day. Each day is broken into 15 minute segments. Personal activities should be blocked out first. Next, work related activities are added in. Zeller recommends spending 15 to 30 minutes each day and 90 to 120 minutes at the end of the week on self evaluation and planning. This time is used to review progress toward business and personal goals.

*Reducing clutter. To support a time management system, it is important to have an organized office environment. People with uncluttered workspaces tend to be more productive. They feel less distracted and can easily access the tools they need. To maintain an uncluttered work environment, many people handle papers just once. They make sure to execute one of the following options immediately: dump, delegate, detour, do it, or depot. Zeller insists that dump, delegate, and do it are self-explanatory options. A detour is when a paper is parked for later follow-up, and a depot is another term for filing papers. A similar system can be used for dealing with email – there are three possible options: delete, do it, or defer. Deferred emails should be placed in an electronic folder to review later.

*Electronic tools. Electronic tools can also help keep one’s schedule in check. Examples include portable digital assistants (PDAs) and scheduling tools like Microsoft Outlook. One major benefit of scheduling systems is the ability to set up meetings with colleagues without involving administrative assistants or extraneous people. Customer relationship management (CRM) systems are invaluable for storing important information about clients and prospects. Important customer data includes names, addresses, phone numbers, email addresses, and administrative assistant contact information. An organized computer is just as important as an organized workspace. This requires sorting through files, deleting those that are unnecessary, and backing up files that need to be archived. CDs and other storage media must be labeled and stored in a safe place. One option is to use mirrored servers so that backups always exist.

Time management can be challenging when a job requires a lot of travel. However, advanced planning can make business trips as productive as possible. Zeller recommends identifying the trip objectives before setting foot in a car or on a plane. He also suggests grouping trips together for a weeklong trip, rather than several small trips. Each day should be scheduled as tightly as possible. It is useful to book hotels based on convenience and services like Internet access, room service, and a business center. Try to pack efficiently by color coordinating clothing, using hotel toiletries, and investing in a small laptop and electronic reader.

Leaders : INSPIRE and MOTIVATE

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THE ABILITY TO INSPIRE AND MOTIVATE

Most people work at only 40 to 50 percent of their capacity, and leaders have to be able to push them beyond their usual performance and get the best out of them. To do this, they have to find out what motivates their employees. There are six specific motivational factors that can turn an average employee into an exceptional one:

Session by Anubha on Leadership & Motivation for First Time Leader role

Session by Anubha on Leadership & Motivation for Upper Middle Mgmt team in Leading Bank

  1. Employees need to be challenged and find interest in their work. A great leader finds work that keeps their employees engaged.
  2. Employees appreciate open communication and they like to understand how the work they are doing fits the company’s mission. Leaders should explain to employees how their roles affect the company.
  3. Employees are more likely to take an interest in their tasks when they are given responsibility and held accountable.
  4. Employees want the opportunity to advance and learn more.
  5. Employees are somewhat motivated by money.
  6. Working conditions are also important.

Employees also have three emotional needs — dependence,independence, and interdependence. If all of these are met, employees will stay motivated and inspired.

Leaders must also be able to delegate tasks to their employees not only because it gives them a sense of ownership and responsibility, but also because it frees up the leaders to concentrate on high-value tasks. However, it is crucial that the right employees are given the right tasks — their abilities must match the responsibility of the task. If tasks are delegated to the wrong people, it will lead to failure.

Leaders also motivate and inspire by example. Leaders can accept nothing less than the best from themselves and the companies they work for. They must commit 100 percent of themselves to their work. The more excited and enthusiastic leaders are the more excited and enthusiastic their employees will be. Through constant encouragement, leaders empower their employees.

SELF-ESTEEM IN LEADERSHIP

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THE ROLE OF SELF-ESTEEM IN LEADERSHIP

Leadership Session with Service Sector by Anubha

Leadership Session in  Service Sector by Anubha

One of the most important character traits a great leader must have is high self-esteem. Self-esteem is a feeling of competence, of being capable. It is important because people with low self-esteem will treat others poorly to make themselves feel better. In order to have great self-esteem, leaders must have strong senses of self-awareness. They should take time to understand their motives and be objective about them. Leaders should only take on tasks that they can be great at — if they are unable to do it well, they should delegate it. They look at themselves honestly, without arrogance or pride, and they are secure and able to learn from their mistakes. They understand that they have both strengths and weaknesses.

Leaders are also extremely self-motivated. They are dreamers and can usually see the future with clarity. Leaders set goals for themselves, each time setting the goals a little higher and gaining the commitment of others. Leaders put in the time required to meet their goals.

VISUAL AIDS in PRESENTATION SKILLS

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Visual aids clarify information and transmit it more efficiently. As the saying goes, “A picture is worth a thousand words.” They also anchor the presentation and keep the presenter on task. Screen Shot 2015-08-12 at 7.25.37 pmAudiences enjoy visual aids, no matter how charismatic the speaker. They also help those who are visual rather than auditory or kinesthetic learners.

Although seemingly outdated, traditional visual aids such as flip charts and overheads still have their place. Flip charts are large and can be difficult to transport, but every good speaker should know how to use them. They do not need a darkened room or any supporting technology. Good charts are few in number, simple, and bold. Practicing on plain paper ahead of the presentation will help.

There are a few tricks for flip charts:

*Leaving a blank page between each one used will prevent bleed through.

*Writing done lightly in pencil ahead of the presentation will not be visible to the audience. This is useful trick for notes, such as reminder of what’s on the next page.

*Flip charts can be reused if they are handled properly between engagements.

*Adding color is good, but only one accent color should be used along with black.

*Perforated flip charts allow pages to be removed and hung around the room. Post-it-note style charts are also available.

Many speakers use handouts because they ensure every audience member can see the main points. They also provide a reference for later. However, if the audience reads a handout instead of watching the presentation, they can distract from the speaker.

Most speakers today use LCD projectors attached to computers. The price of projectors and projector bulbs, once prohibitively expensive, has fallen significantly. Laskowski also carries a set of portable speakers that plug into his computer. The projector should be given a dry run before the presentation, ensuring that it is positioned the proper distance from the screen, that everything is connected properly, and that there are no technical problems.

No matter the medium, visual aids must be large and clear. For an audience 30 feet away, a 24-point type might suffice, but at 75 or 100 feet, the speaker needs letters as large as 48 point. Also, whether visual aids are as low-tech as flip charts or as high-tech as LCD projects, there is no substitute for practicing, including a quick run through the visual aids on site before the performance.

MAKING SHIFT

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There is no way to make someone shift to a more optimal motivational outlook, but leaders can help get their employees on the right track by havingmotivationaloutlook conversations. These conversations are useful when a situation is negatively affecting a person or when his or her outlook is having a negative effect on the team or organization. They are also important when a leader sees potential in someone and wants to develop it, wants to offer a person support, or is stressed or afraid to deal with a situation that is draining his or her own energy.

Motivational outlook conversations will not be successful if leaders are trying to problem solve, are imposing their personal values, or are expecting a shift in outlook to occur as a result of the conversations. Leaders should never take the tone of, “I’ve been where you have and know how to solve your problem,” assume that the person shares the same values, or become exasperated if the person does not immediately make a shift.

There are three core parts of making outlook conversations successful:

1. Prepare: The most important part of the process is for leaders to shift their motivational outlooks about conversations prior to starting them. This requires examining their own sense of well-being and thinking about how they can link their values to their conversations. Conversations should begin from a place of mindfulness and nonjudgment.

2. Trust the process: Leaders must then allow the process to take its own course and follow the three skills for activating optimal motivation. They should ask permission from others to explore their current motivational outlooks and feelings around the task, goal, or situation. They should also listen for cues in body language, spoken language (e.g., “I have to” versus “I get to”), and signals regarding if their psychological needs are being met or how well they are self-regulating. Next, they should present the Spectrum of Motivation model and explore the implications of shifting to a different motivational outlook and how to use the MVPs. For instance, leaders can help their employees practice mindfulness by asking permission to use the Power of Why technique; this involves asking them a series of “why?” questions to help uncover the real reasons behind their suboptimal outlooks.

3. Reflect and close: Leaders should then ask employees if they will commit to a particular motivational outlook or if they will continue examining and identifying where they are. Demonstrating ongoing support builds a sense of relatedness, and discussing strategies they can use for self-regulation can help develop a sense of competence. It is important that leaders also reflect on outlook conversations after they are over. Do they feel drained or energized? Did they struggle to remain nonjudgmental?

It can be particularly difficult for leaders to let the outlook conversation process unfold without problem solving, but when leaders trust the process they will find that it has much better outcomes than typical problem-solving meetings.

CREATING A COMMUNICATION EXPERIENCE

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Just as a great restaurant experience involves more than just a great meal, a great communication experience involves more than just a great message. Creating a great experience relies on using people’s emotions to create connections. Without connections, messages are lost. Emotionally connective communications are created two ways:
Through behaviors that convey warmth, caring, and interest in others.
Through content that is emotionally appealing, such as stories, analogies, and humor.
The Communicator’s Roadmap provides a way of mapping every communication experience along a four-quadrant matrix, with the goal of moving from self-centered to audience-centered communication and low emotional connection to high emotional connection communication.
The quadrants in the Communicator’s RoadmaScreen Shot 2015-08-12 at 6.00.34 pmp include:
Lower left: Inform
Upper left: Entertain
Lower right: Direct
Upper right: Inspire
All communications sit somewhere on the Communicator’s Roadmap, from the smallest interpersonal interaction to the most high-profile presentation.
Intentionality is the foundation for a great communication experience, ensuring all communications make an emotional connection with the audience. The Communicator’s Roadmap brings intentionality and emotion to the communication process, providing a method for creating a great experience every time. The ultimate goal is to intentionally shift all communications along an upward and to-the-right trajectory, making them more memorable, effective, and persuasive.
Being able to deliberately transition between the matrix components is a developable skill and is key to creating intentional communications that engage and inspire others. With work and attention, every communication can be more effective.

Change Intelligence- Key Concepts and Insights

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Change Intelligence- Key Concepts and Insights

Leadership balances the emotional, cognitive, and behavioral dimensions of a personality. In some leaders one dimension predominates, while others exhibit a balance of two or three dimensions. The CQ of a team or an entire organization is a compilation of the individual CQs of its members. Groups function better if they understand their CQs both quantitatively and qualitatively. INTRODUCTION:WHAT IS CHANGE INTELLIGENCE? Thousands of hours of research and hundreds of books published on the subject of organizational change have failed to improve the success rate for major change programs. Whether a corporate restructure, a merger, a new product launch, or other program that demands rethinking and reworking, the success rate still falls below 30 percent. To improve this woeful statistic, leaders need to better understand how they approach change themselves. The Change Intelligence (CQ) system provides a tool for self-assessment. Using it, a leader can find out how they balance the “Heart, Head, and Hands” components: * Leaders who lead from the Heart connect with people emotionally * Leaders who lead from the Head connect with people cognitively. * Leaders who lead from the Hands connect with people behaviorally. No one type is ideal, but all leaders can succeed once they understand themselves clearly. People perceive change as a threat, something to be feared, not unlike death. The phases of human reaction to change are:

  1. Denial
  2. Resistance
  3. Exploration
  4. Commitment
CQ AND THE LIFECYCLE OF CHANGEChange happens in three stages: planning, doing, and sustaining. At the planning stage, Heart-oriented leaders should compensate for their tendencies by putting robust project planning methods in place. Head-oriented leaders need to make the effort to involve stakeholders and all facets of leadership in planning for change. Hands leaders also need to be mindful of stakeholders and aligning interests for change.At the “doing” stage, each leadership type can institute procedures to overcome their weaknesses. The Heart-oriented leader can use implementation checklists while the Head-oriented leader institutes a formal feedback process. To keep stakeholders and goals on their agendas, Hands-oriented leaders should use readiness and impact assessments with stakeholders. The same rules apply at the sustaining stage. Specific assessment, facilitation, or measurement tools can bridge any gaps in a leadership style. KEY CONCEPTS * Change succeeds only in about a third of cases because, despite an enormous amount of work on change management, change leaders do not understand their leadership styles. Once a leader understands their “Change Intelligence” (CQ), or style of leadership, they can use the appropriate tools to manage change. * Leadership balances the emotional, cognitive, and behavioral dimensions of a personality. In some leaders one dimension predominates, while others exhibit a balance of two or three dimensions. Any style can be effective with a clear self-assessment and the right tools. * The Coach leads from the heart, connecting with people emotionally, thereby ensuring deep commitment to change. Although this affective style is fundamental to any successful change, it is not sufficient. Coaches need to be sure that they do not let consensus building and a distaste for conflict prevent them from moving forward. Both Champions and Facilitators share the Coach’s high “Heart” score but also lead through cognitive and behavioral dimensions, respectively. * The CQ of a team or an entire organization is a compilation of the individual CQs of its members. Groups function better if they understand their CQs both quantitatively and qualitatively.

For More information and insights get in touch anubha@prism-global.org