Tag Archives: HR

TALENT MEASUREMENT & ASSESSMENT

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TOOLS OF THE TRADE

Part of the reason that many businesses struggle with talent measurement is because they do not know what measurement methods and tools are at their disposal.  Considering the following eight measurement methods:

1. Tools for sifting candidates. Sifting tools are a common component of many firms’ hiring processes. Typically, sifting tools are used in the early stages of the hiring process as they allow a business to narrow down a large pool of applicants. These tools can be preprogrammed algorithms or scoring systems that select the best résumés from the pile.

2. Interviews. Research shows that well-conducted interviews lead to accurate hiring judgments. While interviews do not measure a person’s competencies, they are shown to successfully gauge their social skills and experience. For interviews to be effective, businesses must ensure that they have structure. The biggest problem with interviews is that they are subject to interviewers’ biases.

3. Psychometric tests. Psychometric tests are questionnaire-based tests that evaluate factors like intelligence, personality, and integrity. When crafted well, these tests have been proven to be quick, cheap, and accurate. The most common problem with psychometric tests is that many do not have enough research to back up their accuracy.

4. Assessment centers. Traditionally, assessment centers are composed of multiple assessors who observe a group of participants over a series of exercises and tests while rating their competences. They offer a rigorous process that involves multiple perspectives. The limitations of assessment centers include the decline in their validity and the travel costs of sending candidates.

5. Situational judgment tests. Also known as “low-fidelity simulations,” situational judgment tests (SJTs) present people with realistic work scenarios before asking questions about them. SJTs can test people’s behavioral tendencies or their knowledge. Although they are easy to run, SJTs need to be well designed to deliver good levels of validity.

6. Individual psychological assessment. There is a lack of evidence to prove the benefits of individual psychological assessments. However, many organizations like to use this talent measurement process to determine if mid-level to senior executives are ready for promotions. It is an excellent way to evaluate an individual’s “fit.”

7. 360-degree feedback. This measurement method evaluates a person by asking a range of their colleagues to answer questions about them. The questions are designed to measure people’s competencies or their performance levels. The feedback received from the people questioned is generally regarded as fair and valid. However, the method usually fails to distinguish high performers from poor performers and is inefficient in that many participants interpret their ratings of a person as how much they like them.

8. Work sample tests, simulations, and games. Along with simulations and games, work sample tests have been found to be fair and capable of predicting performance. It is best to use this method in the recruitment process, particularly for skilled or semiskilled roles. The main limitation to this method is that if the design of the work sample is poor it is rendered ineffective.

TRUST AND CREDIBILITY

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When communicating with people who are angry or worried, four factors govern the perception of trust and credibility:

  1. Caring and empathy
  2. Openness and honesty
  3. Dedication and commitment
  4. Expertise and competence

Under normal circumstances, people assume anyone they meet has these qualities, or they are willing to give them the benefit of the doubt. When they are angry or worried, however, they examine everything the speaker does and assign a negative meaning to it. For example, if the speaker is sweating, under ordinary circumstances the audience would assume he is nervous. If the speaker is addressing a worried audience, they are likely to assume he is sweating because he is lying or does not want to be there.

Greenberger gives each of the four trust factors a numerical value, and together the four add up to a “CODE” score that adds up to 100. When dealing with someone who is angry or suspicious, speakers want to come as close to that perfect score as possible. Anything lower can mean an audience will not trust them and, therefore, will not accept their messages. Speakers can work toward maximizing their CODE scores in a variety of ways.

Caring and empathy is by far the biggest factor in the CODE score, worth up to 50 points. The audience decides within 30 seconds if the speaker is caring, and the best way to prove understanding and empathy is for the speaker to relate a personal story. When firing a worker, for example, bosses might show empathy by relating the story of being let go early in their careers and how they bounced back and found a job that suited them better. Not everyone has such a personal story to tell, so it helps to be prepared by gleaning pertinent anecdotes from friends and relatives.

To show openness and honesty — 15 to 20 points on the CODE score — speakers should tell the truth, admitting what happened and why. If the company is still trying to figure out why something such as a leak occurred, the speaker needs to admit that and promise to let the community know the details as soon as possible. The speaker should outline what steps the company will take to prevent future mishaps as well.

Speakers can prove their dedication and commitment to helping the audience — worth 15 to 20 points — by showing that they want to be at the meeting and are willing to answer questions. Instead of setting a time limit on questions, the speaker should let the audience decide how long questions will go on and stay after the meeting to talk to anyone who wants to ask a question in private.

Expertise and competence — also worth 15 to 20 points — is the easiest area to gain points in. The audience is likely to accept that a company executive knows the subject. However, the executive can quickly lose points by using a lot of jargon or saying “I don’t know” too often.

HOW TO BUILD SELF-CONFIDENCE

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SELF-CONFIDENCE TOOLS AND STRATEGIES

Success in the workplace is tied to self-confidence, which is a key competency in the self-awareness cluster of Emotional Intelligence. According to the author, “a confident leader exudes a strong self-presentation and expresses him or herself in an assured, impressive, and unhesitant manner.”

Henry Fisker, the CEO of the luxury car company Fisker Coachbuild LLC and one of the leading automotive designers, is a Star Performer full of confidence. He is profiled in detail, and shares his 10 Secrets & Current Practices that make him a successful, top performer:

1. Take Private Time. Fisker takes one hour and a half each day at lunchtime to exercise and contemplate problems. He explores different angles and solutions until he gets a “feeling” and decides the best course of action.

2. Get Third Opinions. He believes it is valuable to solicit and get others’ viewpoints even if he is confident in what he thinks.

3. Evaluate Capacities. Fisker makes it a regular practice to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of his team. He then understands individual capacities and when he needs to make a decision he is able to delegate tasks based on strengths.

4. Shoot From The Hip. Fisker believes that employees do not like to be over-managed, and want to feel motivated. He therefore prefers the perception of quick and firm decisions like ‘shooting from the hip.’ His decision making process is in fact more calculated and he relies on the first three secrets to base his decisions and empower his team.

5. Go With That Gut Feeling. Fisker advocates this visceral approach as it allows for quick decision-making and is more accurate than logical thinking. All experiences have an emotional component.

6. Take Initiative. Taking initiative defines a Star Performance based in confidence. After the ‘gut feeling,’ Fisker evaluates the risks associated with it and if deemed appropriate takes action.

7. Identify Your Strengths and Weaknesses. Leaders should be cognizant of their weaknesses. He defines weaknesses as “things you could do, but don’t like to do.” Preferring to lead with his strengths and excel, he delegates to others things he likes to do the least. This keeps him “energized, creative, and competent.”

8. Take Responsibility For Your Mistakes. Fisker promotes leaders being honest with themselves and admitting to their mistakes in order to learn and grow. Being responsible for one’s actions leads to clarity and less problems down the road.

9. Reinforce People. Fisker is adept at motivating his team members. He asks questions to stay abreast of what they think and do. By engaging them, he is able to recognize and support their hard work.

10. Be Willing To Make Decisions That Are Exceptions To The Rule. Being successful at times means not following the rules and procedures. Fisker asserts that a leader needs to weigh the consequences of a decision, decide if it is worth the risk, and then act on it.

To emphasize, Nadler offers ten proven strategies to try and further improve self-confidence:

* Being On Your Case Vs. Being On Your Side. Many leaders have defective evaluation systems, are overcritical of their own performance, and rarely satisfied with their own success. “Being On Your Own Case” leads to erosion in self-confidence, unhappiness, and unintentional treatment of others in the same way. A faulty evaluation system can be changed by reframing it to “Being On Your Side” and will result in improved confidence and greater awareness of how an individual evaluate their self and others.

* Reflections on Thinking. It is common to have an internal dialogue. According to the author, the issue is the type of internal questions that are asked. Negative questions such as “Why didn’t I say something smart at the meeting?” produce negative answers, which heavily erode confidence. Paying more attention to the internal questions will help to take control of negative self-talk.

* Busting Perfection: Creating Realistic Expectations. Perfectionism is a form of self-evaluation that stunts performance and sets leaders up for failure and frustration. There is a ‘perfection loop’ where unrealistic expectations are set without critical thinking that creates an unconscious pattern of failure. One must become aware of the unproductive pattern, understand the steps that cause it, and know how to break the cycle. The goal is to set realistic and attainable expectations.

* Success Rules: Who Is Running You? Many leaders are living by rules for being successful that are outdated, rigid, and over-generalized. This unconscious behavior can be re-programmed to enhance self-confidence otherwise there will be feelings of dissatisfaction and failure. Writing down and becoming aware of the rules that drive performance is an important first step.

* Success Log. Nadler advocates writing a success log chronologically with age brackets. The goal is to get a clear picture of many successes in life which are sometimes forgotten or minimized. Reviewing the list builds confidence.

* Current Success Log. The next strategy is to keep a current log of daily or weekly achievements and successes, and after a few months to analyze it to define personal strengths.

* The Five Pivotal People In Your Life. Another useful tool to build confidence comes from Dr. Phil McGraw. He believes that each of us have five pivotal people who represent a positive force, and contribute to a sense of self-confidence and worth. It is useful to write these people down, and reflect on their influence.

* Visualization. Regularly visualizing and mastering the most challenging situations as leaders will improve confidence. This practice creates neural pathways that make the actual performance more natural.

* Decisiveness. Strong leaders act as consensus builders. It is better for leaders to delay sharing their opinions early in the decision-making process and take the role of facilitator with the group. Their views can come out at the end of the process, bringing all the information together, resulting in a better decision. Decisiveness then requires a timetable and action.

* Thin-Slicing. Malcolm Gladwell, author of Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking, coined the term ‘thin-slicing’. He defines it as “the ability of our unconscious to find patterns in situations and behavior based on narrow slices of experience.” Very successful executives are adept at utilizing intuition when reaching decisions, and it is a skill, argues Gladwell that can be cultivated by others.

Cognitive Learning

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Six cognitive strategy groupings can speed up learning, improve learner retention, and accelerate the learning process. Cognitive strategies are the

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Session with Anubha Maurya W and become Trainer and OD Professional with PRISM course

thought processes with which people study and learn. Unlike metacognitive skills, which are higher-level functions, cognitive strategies are applicable to specific, practical learning situations. Good learners use a variety of strategies in the classroom

The six cognitive strategies for learning are:

1. Clustering: The student arranges data for easier grasp and retention.

2. Spatial: The learner arranges information visually in a way that makes it easy to understand and remember, like organizing steps into a flow chart.

3. Advance organizers: The instructor provides brief introductory information that helps the learner visualize the upcoming coursework.

4. Image-rich comparisons: The learner utilizes analogies, metaphors, and literal comparisons that bridge past knowledge with new learning.

5. Repetition: Learners practice content until they learn it, as when students learn their multiplication tables.

6. Memory aids: Learners use words, letters, or images in easy-to-remember ways that enhance retention of more complex subject matter

HOW TO IMPROVE FOCUS AT WORK

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Ten Ways to Improve Focus at Work 

One of the best ways to use time most effectively is to improve one’s concentration skills, love to  recommends the following techniques.

1. Start small. Concentration can be learned by taking small steps over time.

2. Find a quiet place. It easier to concentrate in quiet workspaces and less busy times of the day.

3. Get an early start or stay late. Consider going to the office early to get a jumpstart on projects or staying later in the day.

4. Move lunch time. To avoid crowds, consider moving lunch either before or after noon.

5. Take shorter, more frequent breaks. Taking five to ten minute breaks every couple of hours increases people’s energy and focus.

6. Control personal interaction. Schedule daily social interactions with co-workers. This helps to prevent unplanned interruptions.

7. Acknowledge then dismiss distracting thoughts. When distracting thoughts arise, accept them and if necessary write them down. Then dismiss them.

8. Reward success. It can be useful to reward oneself for reaching a goal’s interim steps. Small rewards on a daily basis can increase focus.

9. Tackle big opportunities. Challenges often motivate people to perform at higher levels.

10. Maintain a steady pace. The most successful people exhibit two personality traits: persistence and consistency.

MINDSET OF GENERATION Y

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Employers need to encourage and foster a mindset in their youngest employees that is receptive to constructive criticism. Gen Yers need to understand that not all assignments will be high-level and that salary is commensurate with experience. Managers need to understand that this generation wants to, and can, make a difference to keep the country competitive and service driven.

Gen Yers feel entitled to cutting-edge technology. These young workers feel that companies that do not invest in technology “think little of their employees and customers.” Technology helps employees work faster and better. If a company does not have a budget for upgrades, Gen Yers can be asked to experiment with what technology the company does have to try and make the best use of it.

Gen Yers feel entitled to a conflict-free workplace. This is simply unrealistic and managers need to prepare this generation to deal with conflict in a productive and positive way.

This generation feels entitled to daily feedback. While managers do not have the time to provide the same level of feedback as Gen Yers’ “helicopter parents,” all feedback should be built around positive and negative critical incidents, and it should be delivered close to the time of the incident. Feedback should be clear, specific, and concrete, and can be formal or informal, like a pat on the back, or an IM. This regular dose of feedback is good for all generations.

To older generations, the most outrageous demand of Generation Y is a high salary. Employers who undercut the wages of the young workers fuel this mindset. These employees, like all employees, should be paid what they are worth. Pay does not always have to mean cash. Other enticements, such as job flexibility, can sweeten the deal.

Managers should consider what Gen Yers need, rather than what they want.

SELF-ESTEEM IN LEADERSHIP

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THE ROLE OF SELF-ESTEEM IN LEADERSHIP

Leadership Session with Service Sector by Anubha

Leadership Session in  Service Sector by Anubha

One of the most important character traits a great leader must have is high self-esteem. Self-esteem is a feeling of competence, of being capable. It is important because people with low self-esteem will treat others poorly to make themselves feel better. In order to have great self-esteem, leaders must have strong senses of self-awareness. They should take time to understand their motives and be objective about them. Leaders should only take on tasks that they can be great at — if they are unable to do it well, they should delegate it. They look at themselves honestly, without arrogance or pride, and they are secure and able to learn from their mistakes. They understand that they have both strengths and weaknesses.

Leaders are also extremely self-motivated. They are dreamers and can usually see the future with clarity. Leaders set goals for themselves, each time setting the goals a little higher and gaining the commitment of others. Leaders put in the time required to meet their goals.

MANAGING NONVERBAL DELIVERY

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Screen Shot 2015-08-12 at 8.11.34 pm*  Power-pose before speaking. Speakers can improve their confidence and performance simply by changing their posture before speaking.

* Enter the stage with confident energy. While all speakers feel some anxiety, the best ones are able to channel nervous energy into calm confidence. When entering the stage, they project a level of energy that reinforces the purpose of their speech.

* Speakers should settle themselves and connect with the audience before speaking. Speakers commonly fuss with papers or computers before they speak. Listeners will have a better first impression of someone who comes across as composed and relaxed.

* Decide on a base position for hands. When not gesturing, speakers need to place their hands so as to feel and look comfortable. Relaxing hands and arms at one’s sides conveys friendliness, while holding hands together at navel level appears more authoritative.

* Hold eye contact with individuals for 3-5 seconds. To encourage trust, speakers should choose specific listeners and hold eye contact with them for approximately the length of one or two sentences.

* Match movement to message and venue. Some speeches are best without movement. Business presentations and some other types need a small degree of movement. Keynotes require the most movement.

* Start and end at the front and center of the stage. This is a natural focal point for the audience. It also minimizes the distance between speaker and listeners.

* In stories, give each character a personality. To bring characters to life, it is important to give them distinctive physical presences and voices. Additionally, each character may be acted out at a particular stage location.

* Gesture naturally. There is no perfect number or type of gesture. Speakers should use whatever gestures seem natural and appropriate to the message.

* Accept applause gracefully. Standing still when finishing a business presentation signals confidence and invites questions.

* Maintain poise while exiting. Speakers who leave the stage with confidence and poise can keep an emotional bond with the audience as they depart.

* Dress to relate. It is a mistake to over- or under-dress. The speaker’s goal should be to dress in the same style and one step above the audience; for example, wearing a suit for a business presentation where most listeners’ attire is business casual.

CREATING A COMMUNICATION EXPERIENCE

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Just as a great restaurant experience involves more than just a great meal, a great communication experience involves more than just a great message. Creating a great experience relies on using people’s emotions to create connections. Without connections, messages are lost. Emotionally connective communications are created two ways:
Through behaviors that convey warmth, caring, and interest in others.
Through content that is emotionally appealing, such as stories, analogies, and humor.
The Communicator’s Roadmap provides a way of mapping every communication experience along a four-quadrant matrix, with the goal of moving from self-centered to audience-centered communication and low emotional connection to high emotional connection communication.
The quadrants in the Communicator’s RoadmaScreen Shot 2015-08-12 at 6.00.34 pmp include:
Lower left: Inform
Upper left: Entertain
Lower right: Direct
Upper right: Inspire
All communications sit somewhere on the Communicator’s Roadmap, from the smallest interpersonal interaction to the most high-profile presentation.
Intentionality is the foundation for a great communication experience, ensuring all communications make an emotional connection with the audience. The Communicator’s Roadmap brings intentionality and emotion to the communication process, providing a method for creating a great experience every time. The ultimate goal is to intentionally shift all communications along an upward and to-the-right trajectory, making them more memorable, effective, and persuasive.
Being able to deliberately transition between the matrix components is a developable skill and is key to creating intentional communications that engage and inspire others. With work and attention, every communication can be more effective.

Do Number of Words have SUCCESS MANTRA

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SOMETHING INTERESTING…. I REALISED – How numbers of letter in a word changes our thought process and make us achieve what we want. We can be individualist in our approach with “i” but when we talk about “V” i.e we, being together is a first step that we need to take or for that matter my vs we ( 2 letter words) . Further, all the challenging situation can be handled in joyful manner rather than feeling sad and rather than thinking why sadness in my life. When you enjoy the moment you see challenges from different eye. So EnJOY.

Spread Love without any expectation. Although you have full right to Hate, but once just change your lens from hate to love, you will see life moving in your terms of your condition. We sometimes get trapped in to be happy or get angry – 5 letter word- and not to miss Lying vs Truth. You should never lie just to make other person feed good rather be truthful and with assertive approach be honest.

Now choice is all yours success or failure – both are in your hands and its you who make choice between both of them. Nothing is easy but nor tough either ….. we have to keep trying till we achieve. and Lastly be POSITIVE – even though good photograph are developed from Negatives.

Its COINCIDENCE that all the opposites of each words are with same number of alphabets,

Its we who decides our DESTINY. The SUCCESS MANTRA with letters of words…… Visit http://www.prism-global.org/index.html.