Tag Archives: #hr training

DARE TO DREAM

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Be yourself

People spend too much time and effort trying to behave how others want them to and not enough time being true to themselves. However, authenticity is what is required to be successful in life.

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Prism Created by Anubha Maurya Walia

Tips for being authentic include:

*Knowing one’s strengths and weaknesses, and building on the strengths.

*Avoiding comparisons to others and instead focusing on applying strengths to achieving goals.

*Being positive and treating others with respect.

*Admitting to mistakes and taking responsibility for actions.

*Avoiding self-criticism and dwelling on the negative. It is better to learn from mistakes and move on.

*Not focusing on being liked but focusing on earning respect.

*Relaxing and realizing in hindsight things are not usually as big a deal as they seem.

*Not worrying about pleasing everyone–it is impossible.

*Following one’s instincts and inner voice.

Dreams Do Not Happen Overnight

It can take time to realize one’s dreams, and the path begins with goal setting. To get started, individuals should:

*Write goals down to ingrain them.

*Choose achievable, not unrealistic, goals.

*Visualize success because it is motivating.

*Seek advice and support from others.

*Set realistic time frames for achievements.

*Take smaller steps toward one big goal.

*Stick to it.

*Be flexible.

*Take time to celebrate successes.

Mistakes Make You Smarter and Stronger

Mistakes are learning experiences that strengthen character and build resilience. The fear of making mistakes stifles growth. Benefiting from mistakes comes through:

*Taking responsibility for them.

*Understanding what went wrong.

*Viewing mistakes as learning opportunities rather than failures.

*Avoiding unnecessary mistakes, like those that come from a lack of understanding.

*Looking for solutions first instead of seeking to blame.

*Being rational instead of emotional.

*Maintaining a sense of perspective–what seems monumental could be minor.

*Avoiding judgment.

*Letting it go. Just learn and move on.

*Reflecting on missteps.

Insights Come from Everywhere

People never know for certain who or what situation might provide them with valuable, life-changing insights. To stay open to insights, individuals must:

*Realize insights are everywhere, explore the world, and start conversations.

*Practice inventive thought.

*Write ideas down.

*Change their environments to spark creativity.

*Practice personal brainstorming.

*Always question why.

*Overcome limiting habits.

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Engaged employees

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Highly engaged employees know that their contributions and levels of engagement are significantly influenced by how they approach their work. A person contributes within an organization in five ways:

1. The Private: Like a military soldier of the lowest rank must learn, the basic requirements for making a contribution are first to show up and then to follow through. Sadly, those employees who do indeed show up and follow through could outperform over half the working population.

2. The Learner: When acquiring knowledge and skills needed to perform the basic and building tasks, learners must be willing to observe, ask for and receive feedback, and practice until they can accomplish those tasks on their own. They have to be coachable.

3. The Expert: As they accomplish tasks with expertise, employees build confidence and increase their level of engagement. They deliver high-quality results with a sense of pride and ownership.

4. The Coach: Expert employees naturally have the opportunity to become coaches by training, mentoring, guiding, and developing others. Highly engaged employees make deliberate plans to do so and set these goals as personal priorities. Thus, they multiply the scale of their influence and magnify the impact they make to the organization. They unselfishly seek to help the motivation and development of others.

5. The Visionary: Highly engaged employees choose to become visionaries, seeking opportunities and solutions to build the future. They understand that success is never final and that continuous improvement is a way of life. They want to make a difference and contribute to the progress and direction of an organization. They anticipate trends, network with others inside and outside the organization, and bring people together to solve problems.

As employees progress through the different levels, they spend more time behaving in ways that increases their contribution and value to the organization, as well as their level of engagement.

10 HABITS for TIME MANAGEMENT

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Ten Habits That Promote Time Efficiency 

1. Start the day early. Since most people are more productive in the morning, Zeller recommends getting up a half hour to an hour earlier than usual.

2. Plan for the next day. Allocate time each evening to set up for the next day. Planning should incorporate both personal and work obligations.

3. Pay attention to health issues. Eat a healthy diet and have small frequent meals throughout the day to maintain energy. Exercise is also important. Scientific research proves that exercise stimulates chemicals that promote positive thoughts. Also be sure to get enough sleep each night.

4. Set aside downtime. Like children, adults also need unstructured blocks of time.

5. Plan meals for the week. Consider planning meals just once a week. This prevents wasting time each day deciding what to eat.

6. Delegate almost everything. Determine which tasks are most important and then delegate everything else.

7. Say no more often. There are countless demands on people’s time. It is essential to protect work and pastimes from other less important tasks. Say no when asked to take on activities that do not align with your goals.

8. Always use a time management system. The best way to retain time management skills is to adopt a system for managing time.

9. Simplify life. Owning and maintaining possessions is time consuming. Zeller recommends that people consider how their material items align with their goals. Objects that do not support one’s goals should be discarded.

10. Begin every day at zero. Leave mistakes, disappointments, and failures in the past. Things that happened yesterday need not affect the outcome of today.

Time Savers for Life Outside Work

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Ten Time Savers for Life Outside Work 

By managing time effectively outside work, people have more freedom to do the activities they truly enjoy.

1. Hire out yard work. Yard maintenance can add hours to weekly house responsibilities. Consider hiring someone to do that work.

2. Hire a personal chef to cook dinners in advance. Many families who value healthy meals hire a personal chef to cook and freeze dinners for the week. If a personal chef is too costly, other alternatives include meal preparation businesses or cooking in bulk.

3. Hire a house cleaner. One good way to find a house cleaner is to get a referral from a friend.

4. Get childcare for errand running. When it comes time to run errands, it is more time efficient to leave the kids at home with a sitter.

5. Use pickup and delivery services. Instead of spending time running errands, consider using a courier or a pickup and delivery service.

6. Explore shopping alternatives. Online shopping has made shopping very easy. Other alternative forms of retail shopping including grocery stores that provide scheduled ordering and delivery services, and stores with personal shoppers.

7. Consider on-site car service. Many auto detailers offer on-site services which are well suited for busy people.

8. Use a travel agent to book trips. Although many online travel sites exist, travel agents have access to sophisticated tools. These can be a time saving alternative.

9. Let someone else wrap gifts. Many stores offer complimentary wrapping services.

10. Use a greeting card service. Online services exist which will send cards every year to designated people.

Ten Time Saving Technologies 

1. Handheld digital voice recorders. These can be used to record notes and dictate correspondence.

2. Customer Relationship Management (CRM) Software. CRM software enables businesses to maintain client and prospect information in a database.

3. Finance software or internet banking. Online bill paying makes managing finances easier than ever.

4. Phone and web conferencing solutions. Conference bridge lines are convenient for phone meetings, while online conferencing solutions can enhance presentations and meetings.

5. Wireless headsets. Wireless headsets are useful for people who spend a lot of time on the phone. They free one’s hands to take notes or walk around.

6. Mobile phones and text messaging. Text messages are another alternative for communicating quickly with people.

7. Instant messaging. Instant messaging is very useful in the workplace when people are in different locations.

8. E-book readers. These enable users to carry hundreds of digital books in a small, portable device.

9. GPS systems. These systems are ideal for people who travel for their jobs.

10. Digital video recorders. DVRs allow people to record television shows and then watch them at their convenience. They also allow viewers to fast forward through commercials.

HOW TO MAKE TRAINING MEMORABLE

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MAKING TRAINING EVENTS MEMORABLE

One of the secrets to creating memorable events is to create a training plan in advance of the session. When developing this type of plan, instructors can consider nine techniques:

  • Eliciting input about what learners hope will be covered and excluded.
  • Establishing training goals at the beginning of the session.
  • Using a building block approach to content, moving from basic concepts to more advanced ones.
  • Building in time for learners to process what they have learned.
  • Selecting three to five key concepts to focus on.
  • Addressing all learning modalities, including visual, auditory, and kinesthetic learners.
  • Using creative training aids that incorporate sound, color, motion and novelty.
  • Confirming that learning is happening.
  • Incorporating an activity that assesses whether the learners’ needs have been met.

Another way to ensure that training sessions are successful is to schedule them at the optimal time of day and time of year. Instructors must consider learners’ body clocks or “circadian rhythms.” The best time to hold heavy thinking activities is between 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. The starting and ending times for training should also take into account travel patterns and work hours. Trainers should also pay attention to the best month, the best day of the week, and the best time of the month to schedule sessions. Onsite training is convenient for attendees, but the proximity of the office can also be a distraction for participants.

To make the most of classroom time, suggestions are : (1) ensure that all details are set, (2) rehearse the instructions, (3) plan all the class activities in advance, (4) create flip chart headers in advance, (5) send forms to participants in advance, (6) bring extras of all materials, (7) be prepared to control the heat and other aspects of the environment, (8) use creative ways to select volunteers and form groups, (9) manage learner behavior, (10) draw learners back to the classroom on time, (11) ask learners to assess their assignments, (12) gather learner feedback throughout the session, (13) monitor time, and (14) flick the lights on and off to attract attention.

You can invite Anubha for conducting TTT ( Train The Trainer ) in your organisation.Contact details: training@prism-global.org, anubhawalia@gmail.com

TRAINING NEED ASSESSMENT

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Many new factors affect the workplace today, ranging from globalization to new technologies and the next generation of young workers. All of these factors and more are changing the rules of training. As a result, trainers must seek new ways to share information with learners. In Energize Your Training, Robert W. Lucas offers many different approaches that trainers can use to improve their sessions and engage their participants. His recommendations are based on what researchers understand about how the human brain processes information and how adults learn.

ASSESSING LEARNERS’ NEEDS

The first step in designing a successful training course is to evaluate what participants need. To do so, Lucas has five suggestions: (1) use participant interviews, (2) distribute questionnaires either in advance or at the start of the session, (3) ask participants to identify priority interests on index cards, (4) create a list of workplace issues on a piece of paper that is distributed around the class, and (5) ask learners to brainstorm key training-related workplace issues in small groups.

Trainers should guarantee that the training objectives align with participant needs. Several ways can be used to accomplish the alignment. One option is to orient the learners before the training begins, perhaps by distributing an audio or video file with the topics that will be covered. Trainers should identify organizational issues that could affect learners as well as what motivates them. All session materials should address the participants directly, using the pronoun “you,” and wherever possible, content should be personalized. Trainers must make the learning environment interesting through the use of music or props. They should also make learning personally meaningful. Instructors must focus on learner needs and let the objectives drive the session. When engaging with participants, instructors can create session ground rules and encourage peer feedback. Before concluding a session, trainers need to review the learning objectives and reinforce the connection between the learners’ needs and what the training has delivered.

From his experience as a trainer, Lucas identifies ten ways to address learners’ expectations:

  1. Conducting a pre-assessment.
  2. Gathering information through an icebreaker activity.
  3. Designing the training in a way that builds in involvement.
  4. Preparing for multigenerational expectations.
  5. Dealing with differences in cultural values.
  6. Incorporating participatory activities into the session.
  7. Providing equal access to all participants.
  8. Creating a safe learning environment.
  9. Focusing on the learners.
  10. Using professional quality support materials.

MINDSET OF GENERATION Y

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Employers need to encourage and foster a mindset in their youngest employees that is receptive to constructive criticism. Gen Yers need to understand that not all assignments will be high-level and that salary is commensurate with experience. Managers need to understand that this generation wants to, and can, make a difference to keep the country competitive and service driven.

Gen Yers feel entitled to cutting-edge technology. These young workers feel that companies that do not invest in technology “think little of their employees and customers.” Technology helps employees work faster and better. If a company does not have a budget for upgrades, Gen Yers can be asked to experiment with what technology the company does have to try and make the best use of it.

Gen Yers feel entitled to a conflict-free workplace. This is simply unrealistic and managers need to prepare this generation to deal with conflict in a productive and positive way.

This generation feels entitled to daily feedback. While managers do not have the time to provide the same level of feedback as Gen Yers’ “helicopter parents,” all feedback should be built around positive and negative critical incidents, and it should be delivered close to the time of the incident. Feedback should be clear, specific, and concrete, and can be formal or informal, like a pat on the back, or an IM. This regular dose of feedback is good for all generations.

To older generations, the most outrageous demand of Generation Y is a high salary. Employers who undercut the wages of the young workers fuel this mindset. These employees, like all employees, should be paid what they are worth. Pay does not always have to mean cash. Other enticements, such as job flexibility, can sweeten the deal.

Managers should consider what Gen Yers need, rather than what they want.

Leading Through Effective Communication- Being A Supercommunicator

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Leading Through Effective Communication- Being A Supercommunicator

As super communicators you should observe these six basic guidelines to ensure effective communication:

1. Lead with the Conclusion: The agreed upon standard for communications used to be gradually building to the main point, usually best to state the main idea first and why it is important. After ensuring that all readers have at least understood the critical argument, writers can continue with supporting evidence, information, and a limited number of links for those interested in reading further.

2. Use Big Words Sparingly: Ironically, research shows that while people with stronger vocabularies are more successful in business, those who use too many big words are not effective communicators. When the audience is concentrating on a speaker’s vocabulary, they are missing the overall message. Rather than responding with admiration, people become frustrated or are put off by the speaker’s perceived attempt to brag or impress. Again, the aim is not to insult the audience’s intelligence, but merely ensure that their focus is on the information being conveyed.

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3. Combat Jargon Abuse: While jargon feels good to use for insiders, it inherently excludes everyone else. When trying to simplify complicated subjects for a non-specialist audience, it is imperative to minimize and explain any use of jargon. Acronyms are like another form of jargon that increases efficiency for insiders but, again, is a hassle for outsiders. When content looks like “alphabet soup,” acronyms are being overused.
4. Shorter Sentences, Paragraphs, and Chapters: Just as with the overuse of big words, long sentences, paragraphs, and chapters are “roadblocks” for readers. Internet culture has promoted brevity in the same way it has encouraged easy readability. Overdoing it can make a document boring, however, so this is not a hard and fast rule but something to be mindful of.

5. Sync Content with the Audience’s Culture:

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When making cultural references or analogies, communicators must be sure the entire audience will understand them. It is safest to stick with shared human experiences (e.g., food, family, sports) to avoid confusion. also need to consider the tone their messages are delivered in.
6. Make it Error Free: Errors ruin credibility no matter how intelligent the person presenting is. Communicators should always work with others to ensure work is free of errors, particularly those a computer may not pick up.null

“A golden rule to be a good manager/leader and of-course a human is to communicate effectively. Our in-depth training modules are designed specifically to bring out the super-communicator in you to make sure you progress and pave the way forward for you and your team.

Our “Be a Supercommuniactor” training module is one in-depth, well researched and perfectly planned as per the recent trends to address the communication issues in your organisation.”

Here is a glimpse of our 2-day session at a leading software solution company.

 

Story Telling

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Screen Shot 2015-08-12 at 8.26.57 pm* Tell stories. Stories are highly effective conduits for learning. This is because listeners relate the stories to their own past experiences and actually form new experiences which incorporate the emotions and ideas in the stories.

*Relive instead of retelling a story. Effective storytellers bring their characters to life through voice and physical presence, appearing to relive a story as they tell it. They use real dialogue to convey emotion, either moving the story forward or revealing a character’s strengths and flaws.

* Create a protagonist with strengths, weaknesses, and goals. Using archetype roles for a story’s characters boost emotional impact and save time. Listeners naturally want heroes to succeed and villains to try to obstruct them.

* Challenge the protagonist with a worthy opponent. The best, most believable stories have opponents well-matched with the protagonist. When villains are intangible evils, they can serve as effective foils to the core message. For example, complacency would be an appropriate villain in a speech inspiring people to take action.

* Introduce a mentor to humanize and arm the protagonist. Most mentors are family and friends. But they can also be inanimate objects like a computer, or even intangible entities like music.

* Craft a high-stakes climax. The more intense a story’s climax, the more it will engage the audience.

* Tell the audience the moral of the story. Most speakers overtly deliver the moral of their story.

* Tell stories using a three-act hero’s journey structure. In Act 1, the protagonist is introduced and experiencing an incident that casts him on a journey. In Act 2, the protagonist is subjected to escalating conflicts and accumulates valuable tools and knowledge in the course of each trial. In Act 3, the protagonist has been transformed physically, morally, or emotionally.

* Bring listeners into the story’s setting. Effective settings are specific in time, location, and atmosphere. For example, the speaker describes the season, weather, lighting, and even physical objects to convey a mood.

* Build a logical narrative structure by choosing the variety and progression of stories. While stories can be varied in many creative ways, it is important to keep a consistent theme and to reinforce the core message in the speech’s title.

Stories can progress in four ways:

  1. Linear–standard chronological order.
  2. Independent–multiple stories share a core message but have different characters, settings, and chronologies.
  3. Flashback–the speaker turns back the clock and then returns to a chronological order of events.
  4. Nonlinear–artful approaches like reverse or complex blends of chronology.

* Adjust technical depth to the message and the audience. Even when addressing a professional audience, speakers must be careful to avoid overly challenging content. Listeners should not be made to feel like they are being lectured.

* Eliminate jargon. Jargon, especially acronyms and industry slang, can lose an audience and make the speaker sound less professional. Its use should be restricted to audiences who are clearly familiar with it.

* Choose messages with universal appeal. Speakers should choose stories that appeal to both men and women. For example, metaphors should not relate solely to male-oriented sports.

USING HUMOR

* Get the first laugh fast to release tension, build rapport, and create likeability. Audiences want and need the speaker to release the tension that builds up before a speech begins. Making listeners laugh helps build a connection with them.

*Use humor in every speech. Humor serves to both inspire and entertain. It can even be appropriate during periods of mourning or tragedy, because laughter helps people heal.

* A speaker can get more laughs per minute with a sense of superiority, surprise, or release. Superiority-based humor often targets eccentrics or people who make bad decisions, and can range from gentle parody to scathing insults. Surprise-based humor may include such approaches as sheer absurdity or screwball comedy. Humor can also be used to release strong emotions. For example, sexual humor releases embarrassment.

* Remember to riff. Riffing is the use of clusters of jokes. The goal is to get a laugh, pause, then elaborate on the original humorous comment.

* Amplify humor with vocal, physical, and facial expressiveness. While silence is important in capturing laughter, exaggerated vocal variety, mannerisms, and other types of physicality can accelerate it.

* All humor should further the message. Speakers should avoid recycling jokes told by comedians, which rarely further the message of their speech.

* Pause and stay in character while the audience is laughing. While great comedians wait for laughter to subside, they remain in character without moving unless movement is part of the joke.

COMPELLING VISUAL AIDS

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Screen Shot 2015-08-12 at 7.25.37 pm* Sparingly use relevant only props. Props should generally be avoided, because they draw attention away from the speaker and suspend the audience’s imagination. They should be used only to trigger emotions, or when showing something is more effective than describing it.

* Imbue props with mul*le meanings. Certain props, like chairs, can sometimes be used creatively to convey deeper meanings.

* Use only slides that enhance a presentation. Some argue that the effort spent on designing slides is better directed into enriching ideas. Others see slide development as a way to think through and enhance one’s content. Ultimately, the choice to include or eliminate slides depends on the audience, purpose, and speaker.

* Storyboard the first draft on paper. When using slides, it is helpful to draft them on sticky notes. The notes’ size limits content length, while the adhesive facilitates easy arrangement.

* Practice design simplicity. Every slide headline should be a “so what” instead of a “what.” These headlines should be able to tell the whole story.

* Use bulleted and numbered text sparingly. Three of the best practices to follow when using bulleted text include:

  1. Begin each bullet with an action verb
  2. Avoid sub-bullets.
  3. Use between 3-7 bullets.

* Use column charts for categorical information. The most common charts in business, these are used to display categorical data when each item can be labelled on an axis. Clustered columns are generally preferable to stacked columns.

* Pie charts highlight the importance of a single data point. Pie charts are best when it is important to show the relative importance of different items.

* Scatterplots visualize patterns or trends in large amounts of data. This approach is appropriate if there are too many data points to label individually. A common type is the time series, with time on one axis and a quantity on the other.

* Jazz up slides with images. Vibrant images can enliven a business presentation. Images should be chosen for their relevance to the content of the speech.