Tag Archives: #Consultant

Kids These Days

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In 2014, there were over 77 million Millennials between 22 and 34 years of age. The number of Boomers is roughly the same. Each of these generations outnumbers the Gen Xers by about 68 percent. The large size of Generation Y suggests it is likely to have as significant an impact on the culture, and in particular on the workforce, as the Boomers did.

Since the 2008 financial crisis, a number of myths about Generation Y have emerged. The six most prevalent are:

  1. Millennials feel a sense of entitlement.
  2. Millennials expect to be rewarded, and even promoted, just for showing up.
  3. Millennials do not work hard.
  4. Millennials do not complete their work and will not take initiative.
  5. Millennials are casual and disrespectful.
  6. Millennials are not willing to do their part and pay their dues, and they want freedom, flexibility, and work-life balance as soon as they begin their careers.

To be able to work with and manage Millennials, Boomers and Gen Xers must discover the truths behind the myths. Additionally, Millennials must do their part to understand why their older coworkers are frustrated.

Generation Y is the first “digitally native” generation. Its members have grown up with technology touching almost every part of their lives. This technology has fostered a sense of immediate gratification. Technology has also contributed to a different concept of time and place for Millennials. They can connect with anyone at any time, and access any information they want when they want it.

Millennials are also the most educated generation in the workplace today. Caraher blames grade inflation by colleges and universities for a part of the problem concerning Millennials’ work ethic. Secondary education has labeled most Millennial graduates as above average and allowed for negotiation with grades and feedback. Such practices have not helped others’ reservations regarding this generation’s ability to get work done. Parental over-involvement also hinders Millennials’ job satisfaction and tenacity.

Given that Millennials will constitute nearly half of the workforce by 2020, companies need to understand, appreciate, and effectively work with them without changing their standards of performance.

Succeeding at Job Interviews

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The following characteristics and behaviors are likely to appeal to an interviewer:

*Being well-rounded, interesting, and curious about the world.

*Caring about more than just the specific job and showing interest in the entire business.

*Sharing a passion for something.

*Demonstrating a willingness to admit to mistakes and embracing them as learning opportunities.

*Having opinions on current affairs.

*Showing initiative.

Interviews provide individuals with opportunities to bring their experiences, qualifications, personalities, and unique skills to life. For the company, the interview is an opportunity to assess a candidate’s fit with company culture.

The techniques below can help ensure a successful experience before, during, and after the interview.

Before the Interview

Interviews are like class assignments–they require research. Candidates should spend time learning as much as possible about the company and the specifics of the job. The goal is to be able to have an intelligent and informed conversation about the company. They should practice these conversations with fellow students to get comfortable.

Candidates can learn about the interviewers from online sources like LinkedIn and Google. This research provides common ground and topics for conversation. They can anticipate questions that will be asked and develop responses in advance. Candidates should also come prepared to speak very specifically about their three top strengths, with reinforcing examples.

It is important to bring questions to the interview as well. This is another opportunity to show thought and interest in the company. Candidates should just be sure their questions have not already been answered elsewhere.

During the Interview

First impressions are very important. Candidates must dress professionally, be on time, behave politely, and use body language that reflects calm confidence. When invited to share information about themselves, candidates should present that information clearly and concisely, without rambling on. They should avoid the tendency to talk too much and too fast. In an interview situation less is always more.

Sometimes candidates will make mistakes when answering questions. In this scenario, they should keep calm and ask for the opportunity to restate an answer. Sometimes candidates will simply not have answers to certain questions. They should be honest and admit they do not have a good answer.

Candidates should ask questions that show interest in the company, not an interest in themselves, including questions that extend beyond the company to the industry and global affairs.

After the Interview

Candidates should always follow up with personal notes thanking interviewers for the opportunity to meet.

CREATE YOUR OWN UNIVERSE

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In the business world, individuals must attempt to understand their unique gifts and contributions and use that understanding to effect change in their organizations. This process requires self-reflection and having the determination to follow one’s “passion, imagination, and vision.”

Study–Finish What You Start

For many, the path to success begins with formal education. Lessons learned in that process can be applied to the business environment as well. Succeeding in college requires:

*Doing due diligence and carefully selecting the right school and program.

*Properly finishing what is started. Even if a class or program is dropped, it should be dropped in accordance with established procedures.

*Trusting one’s instincts about continued education (i.e., graduate school versus joining the workforce).

*Learning to love the concept of studying (education does not stop at the school doors).

The following practices will help make the most of the formal education experience as preparation for a successful career:

*Tailor curriculum to the business sector one seeks to join.

*Create a written plan for managing both school and non-school commitments.

*Develop and maintain a good study environment.

*Know and use one’s best learning style (i.e., auditory, visual, kinesthetic).

*Ask questions and build relationships.

*Gain experience and volunteer.

*Celebrate successes.

Networking for Novices

Networking is a business fundamental, and it is all about showing an interest in others. Networking can occur both in-person and online. The college campus offers abundant opportunities for networking. It is as easy as striking up a conversation with the person in the next seat in a lecture hall. Lastly, networking is mutual; it is not about getting something but about helping one another.

Students can build their networking skills by:

*Leveraging friends and family as resources for new contacts.

*Tapping online resources like LinkedIn to identify potential new connections.

*Spending time meeting people at face-to-face events like conferences, workshops, and social activities.

*Not being deterred by nerves; feeling nervous about meeting new people is natural.

*Creating personal business cards.

*Being real; authenticity should be at the core of everyone’s behavior.

*Remembering that networking is not an opportunity to brag; it is an opportunity to listen and share.

Get LinkedIn

A great networking first step is to create a LinkedIn profile. LinkedIn has become a highly regarded professional networking platform that regularly adds value for professionals, not only in terms of making connections that can further their career goals, but also in terms of idea and opinion sharing.

Some ways to make the most of the LinkedIn experience include:

*Posting a professional-looking photo.

*Creating a strong headline and summary statement (look at other profiles for examples).

*Maximizing experience, including volunteer and extra-curricular activities.

*Including education and related activities.

*Asking for endorsements from others (and endorsing them in return).

*Highlighting achievements, honors, and awards, but only if they apply to career goals.

*Getting recommendations from teachers, employers, and fellow students.

*Joining LinkedIn groups, companies, and influencers.

Creating a Résumé That Gets Read

A résumé is much more than a list of skills and achievements; it is a view into an individual’s personality. Revealing personality in a simple, meaningful, and engaging way is what will make an individual’s résumé stand out from the crowd. Some tips for creating a standout résumé include:

*Avoiding clichés.

*Proofreading carefully.

*Including a well-crafted cover letter that is job-specific, showcases personal achievements, matches key job requirements to personal qualities, and illustrates potential contributions.

*Listing all contact information.

*Syncing online profiles with the résumé; and keeping them professional.

Cognitive Learning

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Six cognitive strategy groupings can speed up learning, improve learner retention, and accelerate the learning process. Cognitive strategies are the

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Session with Anubha Maurya W and become Trainer and OD Professional with PRISM course

thought processes with which people study and learn. Unlike metacognitive skills, which are higher-level functions, cognitive strategies are applicable to specific, practical learning situations. Good learners use a variety of strategies in the classroom

The six cognitive strategies for learning are:

1. Clustering: The student arranges data for easier grasp and retention.

2. Spatial: The learner arranges information visually in a way that makes it easy to understand and remember, like organizing steps into a flow chart.

3. Advance organizers: The instructor provides brief introductory information that helps the learner visualize the upcoming coursework.

4. Image-rich comparisons: The learner utilizes analogies, metaphors, and literal comparisons that bridge past knowledge with new learning.

5. Repetition: Learners practice content until they learn it, as when students learn their multiplication tables.

6. Memory aids: Learners use words, letters, or images in easy-to-remember ways that enhance retention of more complex subject matter

TYPES OF TRAINING

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PRISM SESSIONFour types of training are most often used in formal settings:

1. Receptive training is a variety of “telling” learners the information. It assumes, perhaps dubiously, that students will have the ability to digest the coursework into useable knowledge and workplace skills. While receptive training has limitations, it does make learners aware of the material to be learned. It is most effective when used spariTypes of training session by ANUBHAngly for short instructional blocks.

2. Directive training depends on a leader/follower dynamic. The leader issues directions for the purpose of leading learners to new knowledge, but the students have little control. This method is most successful with a group composed of people with limited prior knowledge of the course materials.

3. Guided discovery training depends on a more equitable partnership between trainer and trainee. Learners plunge into hands-on or problem-solving activities right away. The teacher provides direction, but the learners are responsible for discovering what to do and how to do it.

4. Exploratory learning in this advanced-level training method, the trainer creates the learning environment and the learners take control of the experience, setting their own goals and strategies.

These four types of learning mirror a natural progression of learner sophistication. For best results, the creative trainer will mix and match the methods, remembering to use receptive training sparingly, if at all.

10 HABITS for TIME MANAGEMENT

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Ten Habits That Promote Time Efficiency 

1. Start the day early. Since most people are more productive in the morning, Zeller recommends getting up a half hour to an hour earlier than usual.

2. Plan for the next day. Allocate time each evening to set up for the next day. Planning should incorporate both personal and work obligations.

3. Pay attention to health issues. Eat a healthy diet and have small frequent meals throughout the day to maintain energy. Exercise is also important. Scientific research proves that exercise stimulates chemicals that promote positive thoughts. Also be sure to get enough sleep each night.

4. Set aside downtime. Like children, adults also need unstructured blocks of time.

5. Plan meals for the week. Consider planning meals just once a week. This prevents wasting time each day deciding what to eat.

6. Delegate almost everything. Determine which tasks are most important and then delegate everything else.

7. Say no more often. There are countless demands on people’s time. It is essential to protect work and pastimes from other less important tasks. Say no when asked to take on activities that do not align with your goals.

8. Always use a time management system. The best way to retain time management skills is to adopt a system for managing time.

9. Simplify life. Owning and maintaining possessions is time consuming. Zeller recommends that people consider how their material items align with their goals. Objects that do not support one’s goals should be discarded.

10. Begin every day at zero. Leave mistakes, disappointments, and failures in the past. Things that happened yesterday need not affect the outcome of today.

TIME MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES

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A variety of time management techniques that can be used by people in different professional roles, as well as at home.

Leadership Session with Service Sector by Anubha

Leadership Session with Service Sector by Anubha

1. Link time management to life goals. Clear goals create a sense of urgency that motivates people to accomplish more in less time.

2. Establish a time management system. This includes prioritizing goals and using techniques like time blocking, organization, and electronic tools to manage one’s time.

3. Handle time management challenges. Strive to avoid interruptions and to overcome procrastination. Consider using Zeller’s six step system for faster decision-making.

4. Work more efficiently with others. When organizing or attending meetings, prepare in advance. Determine how much time to spend meeting with customers and prospects, based on their potential return.

5. Recognize job specific time management challenges. Different types of employees face unique challenges related to time management. This includes administrative staff, sales people, business owners, and executives.

HOW TO MAKE TRAINING MEMORABLE

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MAKING TRAINING EVENTS MEMORABLE

One of the secrets to creating memorable events is to create a training plan in advance of the session. When developing this type of plan, instructors can consider nine techniques:

  • Eliciting input about what learners hope will be covered and excluded.
  • Establishing training goals at the beginning of the session.
  • Using a building block approach to content, moving from basic concepts to more advanced ones.
  • Building in time for learners to process what they have learned.
  • Selecting three to five key concepts to focus on.
  • Addressing all learning modalities, including visual, auditory, and kinesthetic learners.
  • Using creative training aids that incorporate sound, color, motion and novelty.
  • Confirming that learning is happening.
  • Incorporating an activity that assesses whether the learners’ needs have been met.

Another way to ensure that training sessions are successful is to schedule them at the optimal time of day and time of year. Instructors must consider learners’ body clocks or “circadian rhythms.” The best time to hold heavy thinking activities is between 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. The starting and ending times for training should also take into account travel patterns and work hours. Trainers should also pay attention to the best month, the best day of the week, and the best time of the month to schedule sessions. Onsite training is convenient for attendees, but the proximity of the office can also be a distraction for participants.

To make the most of classroom time, suggestions are : (1) ensure that all details are set, (2) rehearse the instructions, (3) plan all the class activities in advance, (4) create flip chart headers in advance, (5) send forms to participants in advance, (6) bring extras of all materials, (7) be prepared to control the heat and other aspects of the environment, (8) use creative ways to select volunteers and form groups, (9) manage learner behavior, (10) draw learners back to the classroom on time, (11) ask learners to assess their assignments, (12) gather learner feedback throughout the session, (13) monitor time, and (14) flick the lights on and off to attract attention.

You can invite Anubha for conducting TTT ( Train The Trainer ) in your organisation.Contact details: training@prism-global.org, anubhawalia@gmail.com

Leaders : INSPIRE and MOTIVATE

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THE ABILITY TO INSPIRE AND MOTIVATE

Most people work at only 40 to 50 percent of their capacity, and leaders have to be able to push them beyond their usual performance and get the best out of them. To do this, they have to find out what motivates their employees. There are six specific motivational factors that can turn an average employee into an exceptional one:

Session by Anubha on Leadership & Motivation for First Time Leader role

Session by Anubha on Leadership & Motivation for Upper Middle Mgmt team in Leading Bank

  1. Employees need to be challenged and find interest in their work. A great leader finds work that keeps their employees engaged.
  2. Employees appreciate open communication and they like to understand how the work they are doing fits the company’s mission. Leaders should explain to employees how their roles affect the company.
  3. Employees are more likely to take an interest in their tasks when they are given responsibility and held accountable.
  4. Employees want the opportunity to advance and learn more.
  5. Employees are somewhat motivated by money.
  6. Working conditions are also important.

Employees also have three emotional needs — dependence,independence, and interdependence. If all of these are met, employees will stay motivated and inspired.

Leaders must also be able to delegate tasks to their employees not only because it gives them a sense of ownership and responsibility, but also because it frees up the leaders to concentrate on high-value tasks. However, it is crucial that the right employees are given the right tasks — their abilities must match the responsibility of the task. If tasks are delegated to the wrong people, it will lead to failure.

Leaders also motivate and inspire by example. Leaders can accept nothing less than the best from themselves and the companies they work for. They must commit 100 percent of themselves to their work. The more excited and enthusiastic leaders are the more excited and enthusiastic their employees will be. Through constant encouragement, leaders empower their employees.

THE FIRST MONTH ON THE JOB

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The first month on the job should be spent studying the office culture and refining a new corporate persona. Before the first day of a new job, it is important to contact a direct supervisor, introduce oneself, and ask if there are any pertinent materials that should be read or studied to become more accustomed to the culture.

Every workplace has policies about expense reports, health insurance, retirement plans, and flexible work or teleworking opportunities. It is important to read and reread all information about how such plans work. It can be a wise strategy to avoid a vacation until being at a new company for at least three months. Young professionals need to establish their work ethic before asking for time off, and to be perceived as serious about the job opportunity. When asked to help out on a project, We advises college graduates to be sure to listen, communicate, and be respectful. No one likes a twenty-something know-it-all, but people love team players.

Additionally, suggests that newly employed college graduates should never doubt the power of observation. The first month is a prime time to figure out how things work at a company, such as how many personal breaks and emails are tolerated, how to order office supplies, how to dress for company events, etc. Similarly, understanding colleagues’ priorities is also important. For example, by spotting family photographs on supervisors’ desks, it is possible to assume they value family life.

The first month is also the right time to thoroughly meet and interact with new colleagues. Young professionals can make a positive first impression if they make eye contact, smile, firmly shake hands, and make notes about people and their roles in the company.

Office lingo can sometimes seem like a foreign language when first entering a new work environment. Deciphering such lingo means reading between the lines. For example, when someone says, “I’ve got too much on my plate,” it could mean that have too many projects to work on, or just want it to seem this way, and want someone to take on one of these assignments. Understanding such cues can help a young professional successfully integrate into an office.

A person’s desk speaks volumes about his or her performance and character. It is important that this space is kept neat and organized from day one. Similarly, it is helpful to take the time to quickly remove items from an email inbox, cross off to-do lists, and to remove emails as soon as they are answered. All of this will keep the mind sharp and show employers that a job is being taken seriously.