Tag Archives: #Anubha #Prism #Training #Leadership #HR #Com

How Coaching differs

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Types of training session by ANUBHAThe difference between coaching and task status updates. Approximately 85 to 90 percent of one-on-one meetings between managers and employees is spent discussing project status updates, which leaves only ten to 15 percent for actual coaching. Discussing task updates does not grow the employee’s ability to improve their future performance, but coaching does. Many leaders also admit to having much more frequent performance review sessions than career development sessions, and while it is important for employees to receive feedback, it is just as important to develop their commitment to their job and decision-making abilities.

Coaching itself is defined as “interactions that help the individual being coached to expand awareness, discover superior solutions, and make and implement better decisions.” Through coaching, an employee will gain perspective on their situations and be able to come up with an effective solution. They will also develop a higher level of commitment to the solution and the outcome because it came from within themselves. As a coach, it is necessary to make sure that you have the correct mindset and skill set. The mindset is the manner with which the coach guides the conversation with the employee, and it precedes the skill set. A coach’s mindset should dictate that they can get more done by developing their employees and gaining their trust. A coach’s skill set involves actual steps the coach can take during the coaching session, such as listening to both what is said and what is not said, exploring the consequences of particular actions, inquiring about the employee’s desired future state, and holding the employee responsible for agreed-upon commitments.

Coaching is not mentoring, where a more senior individual is guiding the “mentee” through the organization and giving advice that may not be relevant within the next few years. On the contrary, coaching can occur between a manager, their employees, their boss, and between peers. Coaching is also not teaching, where a more senior individual purely conveys information that the student lacks. While coaching does contain elements of teaching, it is more than the straight passing of information. Coaching can also become confused with counseling, which helps people who are experiencing inner turmoil or dysfunctional behavior work out their issues and learn how to behave and act more effectively. Coaching is similar in that it is training people to act more effectively through finding solutions to their own problems, but the people who receive coaching are not always experiencing inner turmoil. Once leaders are aware of exactly what coaching is and coaching’s many benefits, they are ready to proceed to the next step, learning new and effective coaching strategies.

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HOLD PEOPLE ACCOUNTABLE

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IMG_6678Accountability goes hand in hand with authority and responsibility. Holding people accountable for their performance sounds intimidating to most, but it is actually very beneficial for workers. Like most policies, accountability must begin at the top. If CEOs do not hold themselves accountable, they cannot reasonably expect the same of others. Leaders make a habit of setting personal performance goals and sticking to them. The next step is to then promote the same level of accountability across the entire organization. Once these rules are established, they must be enforced. This can be the most unpleasant part of a leader’s job. It does not mean, however, that leaders cannot help employees by way of providing tools and resources for success. Additionally, employees can and should be rewarded when they perform as expected. This will build a culture based on excellence, quality, and supportiveness.

BUILD LOYALTY AND ENGAGEMENT FROM THE MIDDLE

It is not easy to inspire cultural change in managers and have them go on to inspire others. The best way to effect change is to give managers a broader sense of the organization, beyond their own individual departments or teams. After this, it is important to give managers the power to make a difference. This helps to ensure that they are properly aligned with the culture and strategies of senior leadership. Managers should be encouraged to get to know their staff as people, and to develop personal bonds with them. In this way, a team can develop a shared goal. This trust and openness will inevitably go back up the organizational chain to its leaders, who will find they are in charge of an organization with a strong sense of purpose.

BRING PEOPLE TOGETHER

One of the best ways to mend gaps in an organization is through the sharing of information. When employees know what is happening in the boardroom, misunderstanding and misinterpretation are reduced. Communication also brings people together because employees get to express their own points of view more clearly. This decentralized structure is sometimes referred to as horizontal management. Among its benefits, horizontal management can help hold managers accountable. However, leaders need to be mindful that over-decentralization can lead to gaps in communication, and various parts of an organization will develop their own ways of doing things. This can be combated with smart integration of disparate systems and standardization of company-wide operations.

Another proactive way to bring people together is to have experts from different areas of an organization collaborate to develop new best practices that keep different perspective in mind and can be adopted throughout the organization. This technique can bring about great innovations in efficiency and cost reduction. These sorts of initiatives take time and should be approached incrementally. Early successes will build momentum and prove to any potential skeptics that the system is working.

INDIRECT, EMOTIONS, AND TEARS

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When Bennington surveyed over 700 executive women, over half said they would not choose a boss based on gender. But of the 44 percent who reported a preference, 32 percent said that they would rather work for a man. Their three top reasons were:

Share1. Men are more direct. Survey respondents were especially critical of female bosses who avoid uncomfortable conversations, take everything personally, are poor delegators, or are easily distracted.

2. Men are less competitive. This does not mean that men are less ambitious than women, but that men treat competition as routine while women are likely to see it as unfair or unjust.

3. Women are too emotional. The propensity of many women to cry under stress is not a sign that they are irrational or unstable. It reflects a physiological reality: Women have six times as much prolactin, a hormone associated with tear production, as men. Additionally, women’s tear ducts are twice as large as men’s.

By being aware of these issues, women can start to effectively address them. In particular, they can work on communicating clearly, openly, and directly, stop viewing others’ success as a threat, and be prepared for emotional reactions. These simple strategies will allow women’s leadership strengths to outshine their supposed — often exaggerated — weaknesses.

WHY Leaders FAIL

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Leadership and leadership failure are frequently covered topics in today’s business  Screen Shot 2015-11-13 at 5.43.54 pmpress. In Why CEOs Fail , Dotlich and Cairo state leadership failure is generally tied to individual behavior. CEO’s are generally bright, savvy individuals with experience and a good record of success. The authors believe CEO failures occur, not because of insufficient intelligence, but because leaders often act in illogical, irrational ways, usually unconsciously. This poses a vexing question. “Why do such obviously talented leaders also make poor decisions, alienate key people, miss opportunities, and overlook obvious trends and developments?” Do CEO’s have a weak moment, a loss of judgment, or is it something more fundamental?

Dotlich and Cairo identify eleven “derailers”, deeply ingrained personality traits which can negatively affect leadership style and actions. These hardwired characteristics, often begin as strengths, but when overused can become detriments. The authors believe these “derailers” are the fundamental source of leadership failure.

Why CEOs Fail outlines the eleven “derailers” which can cause CEO’s and other leaders to fail. These behaviors are listed and defined as follows: Arrogance was defined by the authors as “thinking everyone else is wrong”. Leaders with this trait can become so convinced of their opinions, they ignore and irritate others resulting in decreased communication and teamwork.

Dotlich and Cairo define the next “derailer, Melodrama, as the use of exaggerated emotion or actions to hold the attention of an audience. Leaders inclined towards melodrama in the extreme can experience separation from others, decreasing dialogue with coworkers, and difficulty in making decisions.

Volatility, defined as “uncontrolled mood swings” often becomes an impairing behavior when leaders “become a slave of their volatile nature not masters of it.”

The authors believe the next “derailer”, Excessive Caution, causes leaders to fear making the wrong decision. Instead of making any decision, a cautious leader may procrastinate, conduct more research, and actually make the problem bigger.

Habitual Distrust is defined by Dotlich and Cairo as “a continual focus on the negatives.” Distrustful leaders are often skeptical regarding other’s motives and can create work environments where suspicion becomes a virus. Eventually, workers fail to accept feedback and nobody relies on anybody.

The authors define Aloofness as “disengaged and disconnected actions.” Aloof leaders often possess management styles which cut them off from people, ideas, and information. Aloof behavior tends to accelerate during periods of stress.

Mischievous leaders think “rules are made to be broken.” This derailer appears when a manager challenges tradition by acting impulsively without taking into account the impact of their actions.

The next derailer, Eccentricity, is described as “being different to be different.” Eccentric leaders can be brilliant idea generators who create unique environments. However, the authors note there can be a thin line between unique innovation, and confusion and irritation.

Passive Resistance is a behavior where a leader “says one thing and does another.” This derailer can result in confused and angry direct reports and alliances and teams which fall apart.

Perfectionist leaders are known for “getting the little details right and the big things wrong.” These leaders may have difficulty with delegating and often place stress upon themselves when projects are not being done efficiently.

The last derailer, Eagerness to Please, is defined by the authors as “always wanting to win the popularity contest.” CEOs and other leaders with this trait avoid conflict even at the expense of productivity.

POWER Communication

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Screen Shot 2015-11-13 at 6.14.08 pmPOWER notes are:

* Personal

* Optimistic

* Written

* Effective

* Relational

To write successful POWER notes, individuals must follow seven steps:

  1. Use personalized or monogrammed cards to make notes more special.
  2. Use blue ink to make notes look original and positive.
  3. Use the word “you,” but avoid the words “I,” “me,” and “my.”
  4. Be specific and compliment the character or a unique quality of the recipient.
  5. Utilize the power of positive projection by identifying a trait they want to improve and expressing respect for the recipient’s similar traits.
  6. Focus on handwriting, making sure that the text slopes slightly upward and to the right.
  7. Use the P.S. as a call to action (e.g., “P.S. Give me a call next week!”).

10 HABITS for TIME MANAGEMENT

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Ten Habits That Promote Time Efficiency 

1. Start the day early. Since most people are more productive in the morning, Zeller recommends getting up a half hour to an hour earlier than usual.

2. Plan for the next day. Allocate time each evening to set up for the next day. Planning should incorporate both personal and work obligations.

3. Pay attention to health issues. Eat a healthy diet and have small frequent meals throughout the day to maintain energy. Exercise is also important. Scientific research proves that exercise stimulates chemicals that promote positive thoughts. Also be sure to get enough sleep each night.

4. Set aside downtime. Like children, adults also need unstructured blocks of time.

5. Plan meals for the week. Consider planning meals just once a week. This prevents wasting time each day deciding what to eat.

6. Delegate almost everything. Determine which tasks are most important and then delegate everything else.

7. Say no more often. There are countless demands on people’s time. It is essential to protect work and pastimes from other less important tasks. Say no when asked to take on activities that do not align with your goals.

8. Always use a time management system. The best way to retain time management skills is to adopt a system for managing time.

9. Simplify life. Owning and maintaining possessions is time consuming. Zeller recommends that people consider how their material items align with their goals. Objects that do not support one’s goals should be discarded.

10. Begin every day at zero. Leave mistakes, disappointments, and failures in the past. Things that happened yesterday need not affect the outcome of today.

TQM way

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TQM way

During our TQM Consultancy project with leading tyre industry in Sept 2016, team wanted we want to implement 5S as a stand-alone project, as a complete entity? The elements of 5S are all valuable in their own right but they simply form part of the bigger picture of establishing best practice. They sit alongside the other elements of Lean Manufacturing, or Just in Time, or World Class and some of the elements in, for example Seiri (Sorting ), Seiton (standardisation) and other forms of improvement activity. Great question were asked by participants and the answer, surely, is to understand 5S as we understand all aspects of other types of improvement and problem-solving activity and then to agree a change programme for our own business. This is not to say that we must not launch a project which we call “5S” – some businesses have more success if improvement initiatives are launched with a generic, well-publicised term as project name.

Two hours of pilot 5S activity was done to make team realised the importance of same and enthralling moment was when one trainee ‘name vishu said’ i felt i did some contribution to the organisation, another participant name shivam’ said ‘awesome..wow and how together as team we can achieve great stuff. Thank you all my other trainees for sharing wow experience in small  learning. Sharing pre and post 5s (focussed on sorting to start with).

All the physical implications of junk getting in everybody’s way and dirt compromising quality, we are all are happier in a clean and tidy environment and hence more inclined to work hard and with due care and attention.Naturally enough, the elements of 5S are all Japanese words beginning with the letter S and we all know important of S that leads to best achievement i.e SUCCESS 

TRAINING NEED ASSESSMENT

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Many new factors affect the workplace today, ranging from globalization to new technologies and the next generation of young workers. All of these factors and more are changing the rules of training. As a result, trainers must seek new ways to share information with learners. In Energize Your Training, Robert W. Lucas offers many different approaches that trainers can use to improve their sessions and engage their participants. His recommendations are based on what researchers understand about how the human brain processes information and how adults learn.

ASSESSING LEARNERS’ NEEDS

The first step in designing a successful training course is to evaluate what participants need. To do so, Lucas has five suggestions: (1) use participant interviews, (2) distribute questionnaires either in advance or at the start of the session, (3) ask participants to identify priority interests on index cards, (4) create a list of workplace issues on a piece of paper that is distributed around the class, and (5) ask learners to brainstorm key training-related workplace issues in small groups.

Trainers should guarantee that the training objectives align with participant needs. Several ways can be used to accomplish the alignment. One option is to orient the learners before the training begins, perhaps by distributing an audio or video file with the topics that will be covered. Trainers should identify organizational issues that could affect learners as well as what motivates them. All session materials should address the participants directly, using the pronoun “you,” and wherever possible, content should be personalized. Trainers must make the learning environment interesting through the use of music or props. They should also make learning personally meaningful. Instructors must focus on learner needs and let the objectives drive the session. When engaging with participants, instructors can create session ground rules and encourage peer feedback. Before concluding a session, trainers need to review the learning objectives and reinforce the connection between the learners’ needs and what the training has delivered.

From his experience as a trainer, Lucas identifies ten ways to address learners’ expectations:

  1. Conducting a pre-assessment.
  2. Gathering information through an icebreaker activity.
  3. Designing the training in a way that builds in involvement.
  4. Preparing for multigenerational expectations.
  5. Dealing with differences in cultural values.
  6. Incorporating participatory activities into the session.
  7. Providing equal access to all participants.
  8. Creating a safe learning environment.
  9. Focusing on the learners.
  10. Using professional quality support materials.

MAKING AN IMPACT WITH LEARNING AIDS

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Because the human brain needs constant stimulation to absorb knowledge, trainers should use a variety of learning aids. These could be low-tech tools, flip charts, handouts, slides, or video clips. Lucas has worked with all of these and has numerous ideas for making these training aids more effective.

Low-tech training aids include cloth boards to which instructors can attach information to spur discussion, such as sticky notes, graphics, stickers, flip-chart border-tape, magnetic letters or numbers, or illustrations.

Flip charts are often used in the classroom, and Lucas identifies fourteen ways to make these aids more memorable:

  1. Creating a title page.
  2. Limiting the amount of information on the chart.
  3. Using only the top two thirds of the page.
  4. Improving visibility by using letters at least 1.5 to 2 inches high.
  5. Adding relevant illustrations.
  6. Adding graphic organizers, such as circles or rectangles.
  7. Tracing images.
  8. Highlighting pages with borders.
  9. Planning the pages before creating them.
  10. Using water-based markers.
  11. Proofreading in advance.
  12. Transporting flip charts safely.
  13. Tearing pages evenly.
  14. Facing the audience while speaking.

Handouts are a good way to engage visual learners. The content on handouts should not distract learners from the content. Handouts are more stimulating when they conform to the following guidelines: the fonts used are readable, punctuation is used sparingly, the text is easy to understand, the text is in both lower case and upper case letters, plenty of white space is used, key text is highlighted in color, and graphics are used to strengthen the message.

Slides are also used frequently during training. Lucas offers six tips for making slides more powerful:

  1. Ensure that slides are readable and visually appealing. Use eight to ten lines of text and six to eight words per line. Use a font that is at least 30 points for text and 36 points for titles.
  2. Build in periodic changes of pace. Use sound and animation sparingly to energize participants.
  3. Adjust lighting. Dim lights over the screen to prevent glare.
  4. Plan to be mobile. Using a remote control enables trainers to move around the room during the session.
  5. Use laser pointers correctly. If an instructor is nervous, he or she should avoid using a laser pointer, which could reveal a shaky hand.
  6. Devise a backup plan to overcome technical problems. In the event of equipment failure, always have backup training aids, such as transparencies.

Video clips are a way to enhance learning for both visual and auditory learners. To use video clips to their best advantage, trainers should always preview videos to ensure they are accurate and current. They should get copyright permission to show a video. Clips should be no longer than 20 minutes. Instructors must prepare learners to engage with the video by offering introductory comments and providing handouts that capture the important content. To prepare in advance, trainers should ensure that the video equipment works and cue the clip to the opening scene. While the video is playing, the trainer should stay in the room.

DEVELOPING STRONG INTRODUCTIONS DURING TRAINING

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The first steps to a successful training event are introducing the topic and getting attendees to focus on the content. Lucas suggests using novel introductions. For example, the instructor could use a magic prop called “slush powder” to illustrate how training will fill a void in learners’ knowledge. Other useful props include a magic light bulb, magic coloring book, or change bag.

Lucas identifies several ways that learner interaction can be facilitated: (1) using a buddy system to pair learners, (2) playing “get to know you” bingo, (3) creating learner résumés that highlight participant experience, (4) matching people by work skills and personal interests, (5) playing “who I am” charades, (6) posting photos of participants where other learners can post positive feedback, and (7) incorporating personal affirmation throughout the program.

To gain and hold participants’ attention, the author recommends using the following tactics:

  • Assessing the engagement factors of the content and delivery.
  • Identifying the training’s added value for learners and how it will benefit them.
  • Using transition phrases to move from one topic to the next.
  • Altering the delivery format at least every 15 minutes.
  • Creating an opinion survey that covers the key topics and asking for learner input.
  • Using creative noisemakers to attract learners’ attention.
  • Using nonverbal cues, such as silence or gestures.
  • Delivering a memorable conclusion that restates the concepts that were covered and provides an opportunity for final questions.