Monthly Archives: December 2018

GREAT LEADERS, GREAT STORIES

Standard

Screen Shot 2015-08-26 at 8.43.15 pmHow leaders see the world is based on these factors:

  1. Concepts and categories: They need to keep tabs on the ideas and innovations that are happening around them, and they need to know which ones they should pay attention to as they look for ideas that will work for their companies.
  2. Beliefs: How leaders think things work and the assumptions they have about what kinds of actions will lead to certain results play a big part in their decision making.
  3. Values: Great leaders have a handle on good versus bad.
  4. Self-image: Leaders who are self-aware are able to predict how people will react to what they say and do.

Great leaders are able to put a story together that will bring a company where it needs to go. This story is bolstered by the leaders’ years of experience, world view, and personal story. It is built upon multiple frames and it may evolve with tweaks along the way, based on where the company is at the time and what will work best for it.

Advertisements

THE LEADER AS MAGICIAN

Standard

Behind all the structures and policies are the symbols that are placed on organizations. Symbols come together to form the corporate culture, that “way of doing things” that drives a team. They may be the values that employees hold dear or the meaning that keeps them going back to work every day.47069_10151428646131848_2072240110_n

Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz brought a cultural revival to the company after visiting many of the stores around 2007. The Starbucks culture and experience had changed after the company began using new espresso machines that blocked the customers’ view of the baristas. This and other changes commoditized the Starbucks experience and made the company feel less like a local coffee shop. In a memo Schultz wrote, “We desperately need to get back to the core and make the changes necessary to evoke the heritage, the tradition, and the passion that we all have for the true Starbucks Experience.”

Such a rallying cry was symbolic but had a practical effect as the company adopted a new strategy and had a reenergized workforce. The company had been in a two-year decline, but began to earn record revenues and profits after this new vision was implemented. Employees want a bit of magic in their leaders, who can bring forth the company’s sprit and values as Schultz was able to do.

Top 10 Behavioral Interview Questions

Standard

During a job interview, it is likely that you will be asked behavioural interview questions. Find out more about this type of interview question. You can attend #anubhawalia’s (anubha@prismphilosophy.com) session and learn how to take behavioural interviews. Top 10 question to introspect.fullsizeoutput_3506

1. Tell me about how you worked effectively under pressure.

2. How do you handle a challenge? Give an example.

3. Have you ever made a mistake? How did you handle it? 

4. Give an example of how you set goals. 

5. Give an example of a goal you reached and tell me how you achieved it.

6. Describe a decision you made that wasn’t popular and how you handled implementing it.

7. Give an example of how you worked on a team

8. What do you do if you disagree with someone at work? 

10. Have you handled a difficult situation? How?

Some others Behavioural Questions which I usually ask in an Interview and also take a session for Leaders on Behavioural Interviewing Skills

  • Did you ever make a risky decision? Why? How did you handle it?
  • Did you ever postpone making a decision? Why?
  • Have you ever dealt with company policy you weren’t in agreement with? How?
  • Have you gone above and beyond the call of duty? If so, how?
  • When you worked on multiple projects how did you prioritize?
  • How did you handle meeting a tight deadline?
  • Give an example of how you set goals and achieve them.
  • Did you ever not meet your goals? Why?
  • What do you do when your schedule is interrupted? Give an example of how you handle it.
  • Have you had to convince a team to work on a project they weren’t thrilled about? How did you do it?
  • Give an example of how you’ve worked on a team.
  • Have you handled a difficult situation with a co-worker? How?
  • What do you do if you disagree with a co-worker?
  • Share an example of how you were able to motivate employees or co-workers.
  • Do you listen? Give an example of when you did or when you didn’t listen.
  • Have you handled a difficult situation with a supervisor? How?
  • Have you handled a difficult situation with another department? How?
  • Have you handled a difficult situation with a client or vendor? How?
  • What do you do if you disagree with your boss?

SEEING OURSELVES AS OTHERS SEE US

Standard

Many people work for managers who do not seem to see them or understand them. These managers do not seem to realize how they come across, and they often get tangled in hypocritical statements. They are the leaders who get ignored and see their projects stall.

These leaders suffer from personal blindness. How leaders view themselves matters much less than how others view them. They need to understand others’ perceptions of them if they want to move everyone forward. They can be more self-aware by taking the following actions:Screen Shot 2015-11-13 at 5.34.11 pm*Ask and receive: People will open up if they are asked, but the questions should be specific to get the desired information. “What was the best part of my speech?” and “What could I have done better?” will result in more fruitful answers than “What did you think of my presentation?”

*Give gratitude: By thanking people who provide feedback, leaders will be more likely to get information the next time they ask.

*Ask before giving: Some people will be suspicious of someone who is asking for feedback, so managers may need to ease into the topic and feel out potential reviewers.