Monthly Archives: September 2018

PASSION

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Passionate leaders are committed to things that are meaningful or important. Followers are attracted to passionate leaders because they believe leaders who are passionate will see things through to completion. Passion by itself can be dangerous, however, and it must be balanced with wisdom or trustworthiness.

fullsizeoutput_259ePassionate leaders commit honestly to what they believe in and inspire followers to commit as well. However, they are not dogmatic; they must be able to explain what they believe without making followers feel they are wrong to have different positions on the subject. In fact, leaders should encourage people to share opposing points of view and willingly listen to those views. The more passionate leaders are, the more important it is that they seek feedback and input from others who might disagree to be sure they are not carried away with their passions. You can attend Prism Leadership session by mailing to us at training@prismphilosophy.com

Leaders must do more than talk about their passions, however. They also need to act on their convictions. Leaders who say they believe one thing and act in a different manner are likely to lose followers. Passionate leaders also must remain committed to their beliefs despite setbacks. Andersen’s example of remaining committed to a passion involves an entertainment executive who was helping the organizers of a fundraiser for Rwanda. When organizers told her they were concerned they would not get the turnout they had hoped for, the executive personally emailed all her contacts to express her support for the event and to urge them to attend and donate. Thanks to her outreach, the event attracted an overflow crowd. visit www

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FARSIGHTEDNESS

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People are drawn to leaders who can paint a picture of a future that they want to participate in, a future that will be good for all members of a team or company. fullsizeoutput_2767Followers see people who focus on the short term, who are only concerned about the current quarter, not as leaders but as people tied to the status quo. Farsighted leaders, on the other hand, provide a sense of purpose and see possibilities that others overlook. Henry Ford, for example, saw a future where the automobile was the main mode of transportation when others could not imagine cars being much more than an interesting oddity.

In envisioning the future, a farsighted leader does not ignore reality but aspires to something attainable. An appropriate vision should have a realistic time frame, and leaders should be able to explain what success will entail and talk confidently about what can be accomplished. Leaders must be able to speak about their visions in a compelling manner to indicate they are team projects and that everyone must contribute in order for them to succeed.

Another key behavior of farsighted leaders is the ability to see past obstacles. Leaders cannot ignore problems or become overwhelmed by them; instead, they need to devise ways to move beyond them.