CHANGE MANAGEMENT

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Leading people through change is one of the most difficult challenges leaders face. People tend to be resistant to change because of the chaos generated from moving from the current state to the new state. There are two methods for introducing and executing change:

  1. The hammer approach is a top-down management style, with changes dictated to employees from above. It is fast and efficient, and management always stays in control. A downside is that people who are “hammered” can become distrustful and demoralized. Leaders using the hammer approach need to practice constant communication, show empathy, and let people vent.
  2. In the commitment approach, leaders involve employees in all aspects of the change, from planning and implementation to measuring and assessing progress. This is an effective way to build employee buy-in and is especially useful when an aspect of the change is altering employee values, attitudes, and behaviors. On the downside, it requires significant time, effort, and patience.

ImplementManagers and employees alike go through a four-step process in reacting to the chaos that accompanies change. The progression is universal, whether the change is negative or positive:

  1. Denial: At first people are confused, anxious, and in shock about the change.
  2. Emotion: People next develop emotions of anger, fear, frustration, and cynicism.
  3. Transition: In the transition phase, people are skeptical, but their negativity is balanced by curiosity, acceptance, and hope.
  4. Excitement: In the fourth phase, people feel relief, are excited about the change, and have a renewed sense of trust.

There are no shortcuts to leadership development. It takes hard work to develop the important skills needed to influence others. The process is never really complete. Leaders must constantly refine and improve their skills as they seek to “lead on purpose.”

An effective strategy, executed well, can enable you to deliver better results than your competitors because it can help you define a unique position in the marketplace.

We must ask the right questions at the right time to get the information we need in order to truly communicate effectively.

Active listening is vital to establishing healthy relationships. In active listening, you are 100 percent present with the other person, demonstrating your respect for them, for their views, and for their feelings.

Delivered well, redirecting feedback is a positive, empowering experience for both parties. The goal is to restore the individual to effective performance.

It can be hard to separate our thoughts from our feelings about a situation, especially a conflict situation… But never doubt it: a specific, identifiable thought was there before you reacted emotionally.

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About anubhamauryawalia

Contact us at 919818446562, training@prismphilosophy.com. Anubha, a Trainer, Facilitator & OD&L Professional is a prolific Human Process Interventionist, created PRISM Philosophy, ( Prepare. Respect. Implement. Share. Maintain) carries 18 years of rich experience have worked with top of the line blue-chip​ organizations like Honeywell, ICICI Bank, Moody ICL Certification were she was heading ODL, Trainings & Quality verticals. Her areas of expertise include human process intervention, Organisation Development, Change engagement Learning, Team building, POSH and Quality implementation.

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