Monthly Archives: April 2018

HIGH IMPACT PRESENTATION By Anubha Walia

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Screen Shot 2015-08-10 at 6.08.33 pm Presentation Skills is the most important competency for any employee. I have been conducting a session for various escorts, corporates at Senior level and Mid-level and I am sharing Roadmap which you can never forget. HR can contact us at 919818446562, training@prismphilosophy.com for development of their staff on this title.

Map It

The best way to start any presentation is with an outline. Outlines help leaders prioritize and organize their thoughts. This is especially important in situations in which there is a large amount of information to distil and disseminate. Although creating an outline takes more time to prepare, it saves the audience time. Mind maps have become a popular way of outlining; particularly helpful is a BRIEF map. Each of the letters, in BRIEF, stands for a function of a bubble in the map. The middle bubble contains the main idea of the presentation and is called the brief box. The rest of the map should be organized with bubbles that contain the following:

*Background or beginning.
*Reason or relevance.
*Information for inclusion.
*Ending or conclusion.
*Follow-up questions expected to be asked.

Tell It

The best way to persuade an audience is to tell a story. Good stories connect and stick with the audience. When considering the elements of a narrative, it is important to think like a journalist and keep in mind the following key elements:

*A strong headline.
*A compelling lead paragraph.
*A clear sense of conflict.
*Personal voice.
*A consistent narrative thread.
*A logical sequence of events.
*Character development.
*A powerful conclusion.

Stories should be short and simple. Leaders who need to synthesize a large amount of information into an outline should create a narrative map that includes the following:

*Focal point: the headline of the story.
*Setup or challenge: the issue the organization is facing.
*Opportunity: how the organization can resolve the issue.
*Approach: the how, where, or when of the story.
*Payoff: the conclusion.

Talk It

Being brief is not about eliminating or cutting off conversation — it is about meaningful, controlled conversations. In a controlled conversation, a leader asks thoughtful and intentional questions to determine what is interesting to the other person. By controlling the questions, leaders can choose to ask more questions or end the conversation based on the response. A great method for keeping any conversation brief and powerful is to use TALC Tracks:

*Talk: When someone starts talking, a leader should be prepared with a response that has a clear point.
*Actively listen: A leader must listen carefully to the other person to pick up keywords, names, dates, and other important details. A leader should be ready to ask open-ended questions with a focus on the elements that are interesting.
*Converse: A leader should jump in with a comment or question when there is a natural pause, be careful not to start an irrelevant conversation, and keep responses short.

Being brief requires an understanding of what is important to the audience. By focusing on the audience’s priorities, leaders show respect for them.

Show It

Multiple studies have shown that visual communications are much more powerful than those with words alone. In fact, screens and interactive media are causing a shift from a world of words to one of the images. People now expect their communications to be interactive. Incorporating visuals is a great way to be brief, and can be accomplished by:

*Googling images that relate to the presentation.
*Integrating drawings.
*Using short, online videos.
*Using a whiteboard to illustrate.
*Bringing in show-and-tell items.
*Creating a presentation through programs like prezi.com.
*Adding photography.
*Color-coding memos.
*Using icons instead of frequently used words.

When using visuals, leaders should assume people may not read the accompanying text. Therefore, the visuals should be able to stand on their own. When incorporating videos, leaders should be mindful of the time and quality — videos that are too long or too amateurish will lose the audience.

These guidelines help to make written communications more visually appealing:

*Communications should have a strong subject line or title.
*Readers should not have to scroll down beyond the opening window.
*Whitespace should balance the text.
*Key ideas should be called out.
*Bullets and numbers should feature a strong starting word.
*Unnecessary words should be trimmed.

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Leadership Style

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UNDERSTANDING LEADERSHIP STYLE

Leaders often exhibit two types of power. Positional power comes from the leader’s place on the organizational chart and the authority that comes with it. This is the power to hire and fire, to command and direct. Personal power is power that is earned — it flows from the leader’s qualities as an individual. It is granted to the leader by others based on his or her personal qualities, including integrity, respect for others, trustworthiness, and the willingness to work hard and follow through on promises.

People react and respond to what they perceive as a leader’s priorities. These priorities are grounded in two basic concerns: people and production. After interviewing many leaders, management theorists Robert Blake and Jane Mouton developed a leadership model that defined five distinctive leadership styles based on the level of concern shown for people and production:

  1. Bureaucratic. Low level of concern for both production and people. This leader achieves only what is requested and deemed necessary regarding both production and people. A bureaucratic manager”serves the system,” striving to do no more than execute stated policies and procedures.
  2. Supportive: Low level of concern for production and high level of concern for people. Supportive managers want their staff members to be happy, generally believing that productivity stems from happy individuals. They may overreward for minor achievements and be unwilling to address production concerns.
  3. Directive:High level of concern for production and low level of concern for people. Directive managers tend to have a command-and-control mindset, with a low tolerance for mistakes. They may reward well, but expect perfection and use scare tactics in regard to job security.
  4. Traditional: Moderate concern for both production and people. Traditional managers focus on finding the middle ground and keeping things in balance. In trying to achieve satisfaction for everyone, they can get stressed out easily.
  5. Collaborative: Equally high level of concern for both production and people. Collaborative managers aim to create employee satisfaction through the work itself, giving people the support and resources they need to meet challenges. While other leaders see production and people needs in conflict, collaborative managers recognize they are interdependent.

When asked, leaders typically say their styles are either traditional or collaborative. To identify their dominant leadership styles, leaders can ask themselves a series questions, including what matters most to them, how do they tend to handle conflicts between people needs and production needs, how do they assign tasks, and what do they find most frustrating?

The collaborative leadership style is the ideal “home base” for many leaders. Circumstances may call for one of the other leadership styles from time to time, but leaders should always return to the collaborative style. Every other leadership style will provide short-term gains and long-term pain.

HOLD PEOPLE ACCOUNTABLE

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IMG_6678Accountability goes hand in hand with authority and responsibility. Holding people accountable for their performance sounds intimidating to most, but it is actually very beneficial for workers. Like most policies, accountability must begin at the top. If CEOs do not hold themselves accountable, they cannot reasonably expect the same of others. Leaders make a habit of setting personal performance goals and sticking to them. The next step is to then promote the same level of accountability across the entire organization. Once these rules are established, they must be enforced. This can be the most unpleasant part of a leader’s job. It does not mean, however, that leaders cannot help employees by way of providing tools and resources for success. Additionally, employees can and should be rewarded when they perform as expected. This will build a culture based on excellence, quality, and supportiveness.

BUILD LOYALTY AND ENGAGEMENT FROM THE MIDDLE

It is not easy to inspire cultural change in managers and have them go on to inspire others. The best way to effect change is to give managers a broader sense of the organization, beyond their own individual departments or teams. After this, it is important to give managers the power to make a difference. This helps to ensure that they are properly aligned with the culture and strategies of senior leadership. Managers should be encouraged to get to know their staff as people, and to develop personal bonds with them. In this way, a team can develop a shared goal. This trust and openness will inevitably go back up the organizational chain to its leaders, who will find they are in charge of an organization with a strong sense of purpose.

BRING PEOPLE TOGETHER

One of the best ways to mend gaps in an organization is through the sharing of information. When employees know what is happening in the boardroom, misunderstanding and misinterpretation are reduced. Communication also brings people together because employees get to express their own points of view more clearly. This decentralized structure is sometimes referred to as horizontal management. Among its benefits, horizontal management can help hold managers accountable. However, leaders need to be mindful that over-decentralization can lead to gaps in communication, and various parts of an organization will develop their own ways of doing things. This can be combated with smart integration of disparate systems and standardization of company-wide operations.

Another proactive way to bring people together is to have experts from different areas of an organization collaborate to develop new best practices that keep different perspective in mind and can be adopted throughout the organization. This technique can bring about great innovations in efficiency and cost reduction. These sorts of initiatives take time and should be approached incrementally. Early successes will build momentum and prove to any potential skeptics that the system is working.