Month: February 2016

  • QUESTION ANSWER IN PRESENTATION SKILLS

    With the speech completed, it is time to take questions. This should be a five-step process: Listen to the entire question. Repeat the entire question. Pause. Many presenters tend to answer easy questions too quickly, revealing their struggle with difficult questions when they are forced to search for an answer. Answer the question. If the…

  • Many new factors affect the workplace today, ranging from globalization to new technologies and the next generation of young workers. All of these factors and more are changing the rules of training. As a result, trainers must seek new ways to share information with learners. In Energize Your Training, Robert W. Lucas offers many different…

  • THE FIRST MONTH ON THE JOB

    The first month on the job should be spent studying the office culture and refining a new corporate persona. Before the first day of a new job, it is important to contact a direct supervisor, introduce oneself, and ask if there are any pertinent materials that should be read or studied to become more accustomed…

  • SEVEN LEARNING STYLES

    People learn in different ways, and any audience will include members that have different learning styles. A presenter should accommodate all of these styles. Experts typically recognize seven learning styles: Visual Auditory Verbal Kinesthetic Mathematical Social Solitary Visual aids serve the visual learner best. Including time for group discussions and providing a recording of the…

  • VISUAL AIDS in PRESENTATION SKILLS

    Visual aids clarify information and transmit it more efficiently. As the saying goes, “A picture is worth a thousand words.” They also anchor the presentation and keep the presenter on task. Audiences enjoy visual aids, no matter how charismatic the speaker. They also help those who are visual rather than auditory or kinesthetic learners. Although…

  • SIX WAYS TO EARN RESPECT

    Training @NIFT… great respect for each other … Many wo/men work for small businesses then attempt to move into a corporate position. The transition is easiest for those who master certain unspoken rules of the game. The six most important rules are: 1. Pay attention to titles. Fairly or not, corporate colleagues judge each other’s…