Most leaders who reach the pinnacle do so later in their careers; however, this level is not a resting place for leaders to stop and view their successes. Instead, it is a reproducing place from which they can make the greatest impact of their lives. Level 5 leaders, or pinnacle leaders, strive to lift up as many leaders as they can, tackle as many great challenges as possible, and extend their influences beyond their own organizations and industries.

Screen Shot 2015-11-13 at 5.28.41 pmGeneral Electric is often cited as a top-ten organization for leaders. For many years it was led by Jack Welch, a Level 5 leader, who emphasized developing other leaders to become Level 4 leaders — or leaders who produce other leaders. Level 5 leaders like Welch can cross lines out of their areas of expertise to speak with authority. People respect them for who they are and what they represent. They often advance the cause of leadership, redefine it, and pour themselves into the next generation of leaders.

The Downside of the Pinnacle

One of the greatest dangers for pinnacle leaders is thinking they have “arrived.” No matter how good they have been in the past, they still need to strategize, weigh decisions, plan, and execute at a very high level. Their leadership momentum can overcome many problems, but even momentum cannot continually compensate for arrogance or stupidity. Level 5 leaders must not treat their organizations as their personal properties. Leaders cannot make decisions with only their personal interests in mind.

When people excel to a high level, a certain mythology grows up around them. They become larger than life in other people’s minds. However, a Level 5 leader must never forget that he started at the bottom as a positional leader. If he becomes successful, it is only because many other people helped along the way.

Best Behaviors on Level 5

Level 5 leaders make room at the top for other leaders. This creates a cycle of positive change in an organization by increasing its size and power. Level 5 leaders also aggressively give power away to other leaders. This comes from their ability to see people not as they are or as others see them, but as they could be. If there are potential leaders in the organization, Level 5 leaders must dedicate time and effort to mentoring them. The best potential leaders will not remain in the organization unless they are helped to climb up to the next level.

True leaders put their egos aside and strive to create successors who go beyond them. They plan to hand off the baton when they are still running at their peak. Leaders must not hurt their organizations’ momentum by staying too long just for their own personal gratification.

Pinnacle leaders are respected outside of their organizations and industries and have reputations that offer high degrees of credibility. The key is leveraging their abilities for the benefit of others outside their direct spheres of influence.




PEOPLE DEVELOPMENT : denoted as Level 4 leaders, they invest time, energy, money, and thought into growing others as leaders. This practice of identifying and developing people accentuates the positives of the organization. Bringing out the best in a person is often a catalyst for bringing out the best in the team.

Screen Shot 2015-11-13 at 5.34.53 pmPeople development is transformative. It invites people into the process of leadership. When new leaders are developed, they become better at what they do and they help everyone who works with them do the same. With the addition of more great leaders, an organization’s efforts improve. Growing the leadership of the organization gives it the ability to expand territory and take on new initiatives.

The Downside of People Development

To lead at Level 4, leaders must focus 80 percent of their attention on others and help them to grow, learn, and achieve. If their focus remains on themselves and what they want, then other people become an obstacle.

Leaders can tell if their egos are obstructing their ability to move to Level 4 simply by observing what happens during their team meetings:

*Do team members freely share their thoughts and ideas?

*If the leader contributes ideas, does the discussion move from his idea to the best idea — and is he happy about it?

*When the team succeeds, do other team members get the majority of the credit?

*Is there a shared sense of pride in the work that is being done?

*When things go wrong, does the leader personally accept the greatest share of the blame?

People development requires patience and big-picture thinking. Helping another person become a competent leader almost always takes longer than expected and is more difficult than anticipated, but the Level 4 leader does it anyway. Otherwise he limits the potential for himself, his people, and his organization.

Best Behaviors on Level 4

To develop people and help them become good leaders, their capacities can be assessed in these areas:

*Stress management: The ability to withstand and overcome pressure, failure, deadlines, and obstacles.

*Skill: The ability to complete specific tasks.

*Thinking: The ability to be creative, develop strategy, solve problems, and adapt.

*Leadership: The ability to gather followers and build a team.

*Attitude: The ability to remain positive and tenacious amidst negative circumstances.

In order to equip others to succeed, Level 4 leaders must follow a five step process:

*Step 1: I do it (competence)

*Step 2: I do it and you are with me (demonstration)

*Step 3: You do it and I am with you (coaching)

*Step 4: You do it (empowerment)

*Step 5: You do it and someone is with you (reproduction)

To create a leadership development culture that cultivates Level 5 leaders, current leaders must:

*Champion leadership: Define and model good leadership.

*Teach leadership: Train leaders on a regular, frequent, and consistent basis.

*Practice leadership: Help emerging leaders to plan and execute.

*Coach leadership: Review new leaders’ performances and correct their errors.

*Reward leadership: Reward good leadership withfair pay, resources, and recognition.

Production: Another aspect of Leadership


The production level 3 of leadership communicates the vision of the organization through action. Level 3 leaders help people see what productivity looks like. This encourages team members and validates their efforts. Productivity also helps people recognize that they can actually accomplish more than they believed was possible.

Screen Shot 2015-11-13 at 5.43.54 pmThe Downside of Production

Many leaders who reach Level 3 tire of leading because of the weight of responsibility they feel. Level 3 leaders also must make the difficult decisions to:

*Be successful before trying to help others be successful.

*Hold themselves to higher standards than they ask of others.

*Make themselves accountable to others.

*Set tangible goals and then reach them.

*Accept responsibility for personal results.

*Admit failures and mistakes quickly and humbly.

*Remove themselves from situations where they are ineffective.

Best Behaviors on Level 3

Vision casting is an integral part of Level 3 leading. Productive leaders must create a clear link between the visions of their organizations and their teams’ daily production. They must show how the short term impacts the long term. Level 3 leaders employ the five Laws of Teamwork:

1. The Law of Significance: One is too small a number to achieve greatness.

2. The Law of Mount Everest: As the challenge escalates, the need for teamwork elevates.

3. The Law of the Catalyst: Winning teams have players who make things happen.

4. The Law of the Bench: Great teams have great depth.

5. The Law of Dividends: Investing in the team compounds over time.

People want to succeed. If they are not succeeding, they want to know what adjustments they need to make in order to succeed. Most people are willing to change if they are convinced that changing will help them win. Productive leaders take responsibility for guiding team members through this process.

Leaders who reach Level 3 always experience success, but not all of them capitalize on that success and move on to the next level. To do that, they must remain focused and productive — all while cultivating and preserving positive relationships.

Guide to Growing through Level 3

In order for Level 3 leaders to move onto Level 4, they must:

*Think about things that help others become better, both individually and as a team. They can do this by turning the focus outward from their own production and helping others become high producers.

*Define each team member’s area of contribution and figure out how they all work together to make the team most effective.

*Meet with the team daily (or at least weekly) to give feedback on performance. They must praise people’s efforts, help them learn from their failures, and reward their successes.

*Find challenges for people to win together as a team. The greater the number of wins, the more they can increase the difficulty of the challenges.

*Know who is who on the team, including:

*Momentum Makers: Producers who make things happen).

*Momentum Takers: People who go along for the ride.

*Momentum Breakers: People who cause problems and hurt moral).

*Be responsible for making the decisions and initiating the changes needed for the team to succeed. This can be done by setting aside an hour a day to think of five new ways to change things for the better.


PERMISSION: Way toward Leadership


When leaders learn to function on the permission level, they do more than merely comply with orders. They follow because they want to. Building relationships develops a foundation for effectively leading others. People connect across the lines between their job descriptions and departments. Moving up to Level 2 is where followers give their supervisors permission to lead them.

Screen Shot 2015-11-13 at 5.34.53 pmThe Upside of Permission

Level 2 leaders shift their focus from “me” to “we.” They develop relationships and win people over with interaction, not the power of their positions. Good relationships create energy and give interactions a positive tone. On the permission level, leaders listen to their people and their people listen to them in return.

A Level 2 leader’s goal is to become aware of the uniqueness of people and appreciate their differences. He does this by letting them know that they matter and that they are seen as individual human beings, not merely employees. Trust is the foundation of permissional leadership. The more trust a leader develops, the stronger his relationships become.

The Downside of Permission

Leading by permission may appear “soft” to some people since caring for others can be seen as “weak,” especially by leaders with a natural bias toward action. Those who start on the hard side and refuse to learn softer skills often get stuck at Level 1.

The most common reason for leaders to not move up to Level 3 is that they become so relational that they lose sight of the primary goal of leadership: helping others work together, move forward, and achieve more. When leaders are relational, their followers sometimes mistake kindness for weakness. They believe that encouragement means they do not have to respect boundaries, and they assume that empowerment means they have the freedom to do what they want.

Leaders will not get ahead with others unless they are willing to:

*Choose to care about others.

*Look for something likeable about every person they meet.

*Discover what is likeable about themselves and do whatever is possible to share that with the people around them.

*Make the effort every day to express what they like about the other people in their lives.


POSITION : Way to Leadership


The Upside of Position

When a person gains a leadership position, it is usually because someone with authority perceives talent and potential in that person. In the beginning, this person has limited power. Most leaders need to prove themselves before they are given more responsibilities.

Screen Shot 2015-11-13 at 5.43.54 pmValues are the soul of leadership and they drive behavior. Before leaders can grow and mature, they must have a clear understanding of their values and commit to living consistently with them. Successful leaders must fully understand what they believe in three key areas:

1. Ethical Values: What does it mean to do the right thing for the right reason?

2. Relational Values: How does a person build an environment of trust and respect with others?

3. Success Values: What goals are worth spending a life on?

The Downside of Position

People who rely on their positions invariably place a high value on holding on to those positions above everything else they do. This attitude does nothing to promote good relationships with others. These positional leaders often make other people feel small by not genuinely believing in them. They assume people cannot instead of assuming that theycan; they assume people will not rather than believing that they will; and they view people as liabilities instead of assets.

Positional leaders focus on getting the largest staff and the biggest budget they can — not for the benefit of their organizations, but so they can expand and defend their turfs. This action often incites others to do the same, creating a vicious cycle of gamesmanship, posturing, and maneuvering. This often results in departmental rivalries and silos.

When people use their positions to lead others for a long time and fail to develop influence, they become branded as positional leaders and rarely get opportunities for advancement. The people who work for them often use the limits of their job descriptions as leverage, doing only what is required of them.

The single greatest hindrance to a leader’s growth is becoming positional in his thinking. When a person thinks he has arrived — no matter where his position is in the organization — he has lowered expectations for himself, sold his leadership short, and fallen into a no-growth mindset.

Leadership development is a lifelong process. Leaders with a position mind-set need to think, “Today I received a leadership position. I will endeavor to become a better leader every day.”

Beliefs That Help a Leader Move Up to Level 2

There are four statements a leader must embrace internally before being able to change from a positional leader to a permissional one:

1. Titles Are Not Enough: Knowledge that titles have little real value and that position is the lowest level of leadership brings a healthy dissatisfaction with Level 1 as well as a desire to grow. Leadership is meant to be active and dynamic. Its purpose is to create positive change.

2. People — Not Position — Are a Leader’s Most Valuable Asset: A leader cannot focus on rules and procedures to get things done or keep things going. The reality is that people get things done, not the playbook they use. Relying on position is not the ideal way to get the most out of people. People must be put ahead of position.

3. A Leader Does Not Need to Have All the Answers: A leader’s job is not to know everything, but to attract people who know things he does not.

4. A Good Leader Always Includes Others: Stand-alone leadership does not lead to teamwork, collaboration, or high achievement. Moving from Level 1 to Level 2 requires a change of attitudes toward other people. Others must be included in the leadership journey.

Guide to Growing Through Level 1

Leaders can use these guidelines to plan Level 1 growth:

*Write a declaration of commitment to growth that describes what actions will contribute and how it will be approached. Sign and date the declaration. Put it someplace safe for future reference.

*Answer three questions to describe the type of leadership desired:

  1. Who am I?
  2. What are my values?
  3. What leadership practices do I want to put in place?

*Shift from positional leadership to potential leadership. Rewrite goals to embrace a non-positional mind-set.

*Focus on the vision. Write down the vision of the organization and how the team helps to contribute to that vision. Then write down specific ways to make it easier for team members to help fulfill that vision.

*Find a leadership coach. Ask someone to serve as a coach or mentor. Meet with that person 4 to 12 times a year. Plan what questions to ask and what type of advice is needed to solve specific problems.


The Practice of Innovation


Simply understanding the source of innovative opportunities is not enough. People must understand the principles of innovation and how to use new ideas successfully. The principles include several do’s and don’ts. The do’s include:

*Thinking through the sources of innovation.

*Going out to observe, seek, and listen to the trends of public opinion.

*Producing innovations that are clear and simple.

*Starting small.

*Aiming toward leadership. If innovations do not aim at leadership from the beginning, they will unlikely be innovative or capable enough to establish themselves in the market.

The don’ts of innovation include:

*Trying too hard to be clever.

*Being unusable without necessary training.

*Diversifying into too many things at once.

*Innovating for the future. Unless there is an immediate application of a product or system, it is unlikely to be successful.

The last piece of advice Drucker offers on the subject of learning the skill of innovation is the importance of three conditions:

  1. Innovation requires work, ingenuity, focus, and talent to be successful.
  2. To succeed, innovators must build on their strengths.
  3. Innovation must be focused on and driven by the market.

By combining these principles and sources of opportunity, everyone can be innovative leaders in their industries, despite whether they are private or public.PRISM




The first step to understanding entrepreneurship is realizing that it is futile without innovation. Innovation is the means by which an entrepreneur exploits change as an opportunity for a new or different business or service. As such, innovation is very much a discipline that can be learned and should be practiced.

Learning the discipline of innovation starts with the seven sources of innovative Screen Shot 2015-11-13 at 5.28.41 pmopportunity. While they could be considered symptoms, they are actually highly reliable indications that changes are happening in any given industry.

Source #1: The Unexpected

Perhaps the richest of opportunities for innovation success comes from unexpected success. This is the path by which entrepreneurs meet the least amount of risk and least arduous pursuits. More often than not, unexpected success appears in an existing company’s blind spot. Currently, management teams are trained to comb through reports that highlight expected results, so that unexpected success is left unexplored and vulnerable for exploitation. Drucker advises that reports must be revamped to include all results so that people can analyze their businesses properly and, more importantly, look for innovative opportunities.

Unexpected failures rarely go unnoticed; however, they are seldom seen as symptoms for opportunity. Executives typically call for more reports and more studies to analyze failures, but instead should be stepping out to investigate possible situations. Understanding customers’ experiences (i.e., the true reality of a product) is how to exploit opportunities of an unexpected failure.

Source #2: Incongruities

Stemming from unexpected failures, the second source, incongruities, appears when there is a dissonance between what is and what “ought to be.” It invites innovators to investigate why results are not lining up with expectations and what can be done to exploit opportunities. The only major downside to this source of innovation is that it is largely only apparent to industry insiders. Someone from the outside is not likely to spot or understand any type of incongruity, no matter which form it takes. Incongruity appears in several different ways, including:

*Incongruity between the economic realities of an industry.

*Incongruity between the reality and the assumptions about an industry.

*Incongruity between the efforts of an industry and the values and expectations of its customers.

*Internal incongruity within the rhythm or the logic of an existing process.

Of all the incongruities, that between perceived and actual reality may be the most common due to the fact that producers and suppliers almost always misinterpret what customers actually buy and why.

Source #3: Process Needs

New and existing businesses alike can lead innovation in their industries using process needs as a source for opportunity. Here, existing processes are perfected, replaced, or redesigned around newly available knowledge. Sometimes it gives light to a whole new process by providing “missing links” for different industries. Drucker, however, advises that the most common place to look for process needs are not missing links, but demographics and incongruities–both of which give ample opportunity and are largely overlooked.

Innovators seeking to exploit process need opportunities must understand that they will not be successful unless their processes are self-contained, there is only one missing or weak leak, clear objectives and solutions are defined, and there is a widespread belief that there could be a better way to do business. Without a thorough analysis and strategy of all these criteria, innovations are likely to be unsuccessful.

Source #4: Industry and Market Structures

Next, Drucker moves onto the sources of opportunity that can be seen by industry outsiders–the most critical of which are the structures that comprise industries. Indeed, industry and market structures appear so solid to people within specific industries that they are likely to consider them certain to endure forever. However, Drucker points out that most industry structures are actually quite brittle. To most outsiders, industry structures are highly visible and predictable and can innovate under the radar quickly and with relatively low risk. Meanwhile, insiders continue to assume their positions are permanent. There are four near-certain indicators of industry structure changes that individuals must keep an eye out for:

  1. Rapid growth of an industry.
  2. Changes in the way the services or products are perceived in the market.
  3. Convergence of technologies that before had seemed distinctly separate.
  4. Rapid changes in the way business is conducted.

Innovators must always scan for these four indicators if they want to be at the forefront of their industries’ structural revolutions.

Source #5: Demographics

Demographics are part of the external changes that lead to innovative opportunities. Of all the external changes, demographics are the most unambiguous. They include any changes in population, including its size, age structure, composition, employment, educational status, and income. Executives in any industry typically do not pay close attention to demographics because they have the most lead time; that is, they occur over such a long time span that they appear to be of little concern.

Source #6: Changes in Perception

Changes in perception include any shift in public opinion. While the facts often do not change, their meaning to the public does. This can lead to innovative opportunity, but Drucker warns that it is a dangerous source because it is hard to distinguish between a genuine change and a short-lived fad. However, done correctly, this can be an excellent source of innovation for entrepreneurs.

Source #7: New Knowledge

New knowledge is perhaps the flashiest of all innovation as it gets the most publicity. While most sources for opportunity have overlapping themes with one or more other sources, new knowledge differs greatly from the rest. First, it has the longest lead time because innovations are essentially started from scratch. Secondly, knowledge-based innovations are almost never based on one factor, but on the convergence of multiple knowledge sources. Not until these sources of knowledge are analyzed and understood will innovations be successful.

Knowledge-based innovations also carry great risks. They must be solid both in product and business structure when they hit the market, otherwise a company will have introduced a new technology which other, more stable businesses will couple with their strengths to render the new business obsolete.


Customer Delight @Shangri-La

Customer Delight @Shangri-La

I am extremely delighted to share my amazing experience with Shangri-La Bangalore during my Training at SixSigma Yellow belt on 20th Jan 2018 with QLS team leaded by ShivKhera Sir. Customer experience is the experience that I had with a brand of reputed 5star property started moment I landed at airport. It included many different areas, such as airport pickup, ease of sharing, and speed of delivery. We hear “Customer service experience focuses on service” but I experienced with Chauffeur -Adam, Chef – Wasim Reja and Service staff – Tarani. Started with smile; smile of welcome, smile of love; smile of honour; smile of happiness; and smile of making me part of them. Like customer experience as a whole, must appreciated first level call by Adam to Security (we are 5 mins away), Conscious call from security  to Guest relation and than room service and this made me realised it is an important part of ongoing business growth which was evident in aura.


Six Sigma Certification program at Shangri-la Bangalore with QLS leaded by ShivKhera Sir

Having 21 countries travel experience in best of properties; I realised  “customer service” covers a massive range of support options. But felt WOW in India with Bangalore Shangri-la. I sensed they all had in them “Our customers want a good customer service experience, and we need to deliver with SMILE”

Customer service experience connects everything. It’s the connection of all the service interactions. Must visit destination.


Project Oxygen


Convincing high-achieving, independent, autonomous engineers that managers are valuable assets that can improve the work environment is a daunting task, but Google set out to do just that with its multi-year Project Oxygen research initiative. Based on the belief that the best way to win the hearts and minds of knowledge workers was through scientific methodology, the initiative was heavily data-dependent and constructed to test assumptions.

Project Oxygen sought to identify the behaviors representative of good managers and provide actionable guidance for managers so they could improve going forward. According to the data, the most effective managers:

  1. Are good coaches.
  2. Empower their teams and do not micromanage.
  3. Express interest in and concern for team members’ success and personal well-being.
  4. Are productive and results oriented.
  5. Communicate well, including listening and sharing information.
  6. Help with career development.
  7. Have clear visions and strategies.
  8. Possess key technical skills that enhance advisory capabilities.

The program has won great favor with both employees and managers, convinced skeptics, and yielded significant and measurable improvement results.




Time is a precious and scarce resource. Once it is spent it cannot be replaced. However, time is routinely squandered in the business world thanks to excessive emails, unnecessary meetings, and unjustified initiatives.

Screen Shot 2015-11-13 at 6.02.40 pmBecause time is such a valuable commodity (and can be quantified monetarily), business professionals must learn to manage their time as carefully as they manage their money. The following eight practices can go a long way toward making the time a company and its employees spend worth the investment:

  1. Make sure there is a clear and selective agenda for every activity.
  2. Create a time budget that resets at zero.
  3. Insist that every initiative have a compelling business case before approval and implementation.
  4. Standardize and simplify processes and share management across all business units.
  5. Identify the proper authority for approving time investments and treat those investments like financial investments.
  6. Create standardized decision-making processes.
  7. Improve the quality of meetings by requiring clear, objective-based agendas, advance preparation, an on-time start, and an early ending whenever possible.
  8. Monitor and measure time spent across the organization to understand where time is wasted.